Monthly Archives

May 2016

Featured Recipes

Sprouts

May 26, 2016

Sprouts are the first shoots of a plant and are tender, delicate, tasty, and highly nutritious.  They are new life awakening.  Once sprouted, our bodies can better absorb essential nutrients like iron, calcium, amino acids, B vitamins, and vitamin C.  When plants are sprouted they are also easier to digest, in their simple sugar and amino acid form.  Sprouts are delicious any time of the year but make for a great source of nutrients and freshness during the early Spring months.  Early Spring gardening is about hardy greens and delicate sprouts, providing the bare essential nutrients needed for keeping our bodies ad minds healthy when fresh food, sunlight, and movement are in shorter supply.

sprouts

You can purchase sprouted grains at various food stores but you can just as easily do it yourself!  It’s an easy process, offers you fresh and healthy food, and can be a fun project to try.  Sprouts are so good because the biochemical changes that occur during the sprouting process allow them to be more digestible and increase their vitamin content.  For example, the sprouted mung bean has the simple carbohydrate content of a melon, the vitamin A of a lemon, the thiamin of an avocado, and the list goes on.

sprouts

You can sprout many things! Try grains, seeds, or beans.  For grains, first, find the whole grain you’d like to try sprouting.  You can choose any that still has the germ and bran and has not been altered yet.  For example, amaranth, barley, buckwheat, corn, einkorn, farro, kumut, millet, quinoa, rice, rye berry, sorghum, spelt, or wheatberry all will do the trick.  Try these simple steps:

What to gather: 

1-quart mason jar
Cheese cloth or screen (to allow water and air through)
Metal band or rubber band to secure cover
½ cup of grain
Water

1. Rinse and drain the grains
2. Place the grains in a bowl of water, covered a couple of inches, and soak overnight to release enzyme inhibitors
3. Drain the grains and rinse again with cool water
4. Place the grains in the jar and cover
5. Turn the jar upside down and angled  so that air can circulate in and water can drain out
6. Every 12 hours or so rinse the grains with water, drain, and return to the upside-down position
7. Continue step 6 until your grains have sprouted, rinse again, store in the refrigerator, and enjoy!

You can also try sprouting seeds and beans with a similar process! To calculate your bean-to-sprout ratio follow these simple guidelines:

1 lb of small seeds = 20 liters
1/4 cup of beans = 1 liter

TIP: Use 1 TB of seeds OR 1/8 cup of beans to make 2 cups of sprouts

Lentils

Now, you can sprout pretty much anything- try one of the following: alfalfa, broccoli, sunflower, radish, lentils, mung beans, peas, arugula, beets, adukzi beans, clover, mustard, garlic chive, garbanzo, cabbage, quinoa, pumpkin, hemp, chia, garlic, or leeks.

1. Fill a mason jar or bowl with cool water and soak your beans or seeds for 4-12 hours, covered with a cloth
2.Rise and drain with cool water, cover with a cloth, set in a dark place for 2-5 days, rinsing and draining every 12 hours
3. After 3-5 day when sprouts are desired height, set in the sunlight for a day to increase the chlorophyll content
4. Harvest when sprouts are 1-2 inches long with delicate green leave; enjoy within 4 days 

Any of these sprouts can be added to salads, soups, stir-fry’s for a yummy taste, texture, and health boost.  Think outside the box and try your newly sprouted grains at all meals of the day, even dessert! You can also bake with them, dry them, or make them into flour.

Beans

FOOD SOAKING TIME  SPROUTING TIME (days)
Almonds 8-12 No Sprouting (if pasteurized) 3 Days (raw)
Adzuki Beans 8-12 4
Amaranth 8 2-3
Barley 6 2
Black Beans 8-12 3
Brazil Nuts 3 No Sprouting
Buckwheat 6 2-3
Cashews 2-4 No Sprouting
Garbanzo 8 3-4 
Flaxseeds ½ No Sprouting
Hazelnuts 8-12 No Sprouting
Kamut 7 2-3
Lentils 7 2-3
Macadamias 2 No Sprouting
Millet 5 1
Mung Beans 8-12 4
Oat Groats 6 2-3
Pecans 6 No Sprouting
Pistachios 8 No Sprouting
Pumpkin Seeds 8 3
Radish Seeds 8-12 3-4
Sesame Seeds 8 2-3
Sunflower Seeds 8 1
Quinoa 4 2-3
Walnuts 4 No Sprouting
Wheat Berries 7 3-4
Wild Rice 9 3-5

Try out some of these recipes, great ways to enjoy these gorgeous little sprouts!  

Shiitake Lettuce Cups
You may intuitively create your own lettuce cups. Bring together a protein with your choice of seasonal vegetables. You may also like to add 1/2 cup of cooked grain to each serving.
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Ingredients
  1. 1 cup Shiitake mushrooms, sliced
  2. 1 TB Srirachi sauce
  3. 2 TB Unfiltered Apple Cider Vinegar
  4. 2 TB Bragg's Aminos
  5. 2 TB Dijon mustard
  6. 1 block Tempeh, crumbled
  7. 1 cup Broccoli Sprouts
  8. 1 TB Coconut Oil
  9. 1/2 cup Shredded Carrots
  10. 1/2 cup Onions, sliced
  11. 1 TB Sesame Oil
  12. 1 head Boston Lettuce
  13. 2 cloves garlic, chopped
Instructions
  1. In a large frying pan, heat palm oil and sauté tempeh, mushrooms, onions, srirachi sauce & garlic. Cook for 10 minutes, covered. In a mason jar or small bowl, mix dressing using tamari, mustard, vinegar & sesame oil. Place tempeh mixture into each lettuce cup, then drizzle dressing and top with carrots & broccoli sprouts. To finish, drizzle more srirachi sauce. Serves two for dinner or four for an appetizer.
Nutrition from the Ground Up http://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/
Fresh Shrimp Vegetable Spring Rolls
You can also intuitively design your own spring rolls with a different protein and vegetables with what you have in your kitchen.
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Ingredients
  1. 8 spring roll rice papers
  2. 16 shrimp, sautéed in red palm oil
  3. 1 cup pea greens or any greens
  4. 1 cup chinese rose radish sprouts or any sprouts
  5. 1 cup carrots, shredded
  6. 1/2 cup mushrooms, sliced
  7. 1 cup asparagus, chopped
  8. 1/2 cup water chestnuts, sliced
  9. 12 fresh mint leaves
Instructions
  1. Fill a large mixing bowl with warm water, then submerge one paper into water until it feels extremely flexible. Remove from water and let drip over bowl, then place onto cutting board. Lay mint leaves in a row horizontally across. Top with all other ingredients, accept shrimp. Lay shrimp in a row horizontally across. Pull inwards both sides, then lift side closest to you, folding it over in the opposite direction until it creates a roll shown in picture.
Nutrition from the Ground Up http://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/

 Or just a simple Sprouted Sandwich:

1 cup of sprouts
1 TB Avocado
2 TB hummus
1 fried or poached egg
2 slices of homemade Sourdough or a Sprouted Grain Bread

with love

Featured Lifestyle Recipes Videos

Spring Seasonal Picks

May 23, 2016

One word you will see repeated throughout Nutrition from the Ground Up is practice — the beauty of this approach is that it is shifting your relationship with your food, which will happen over time. Picking out a few in-season fruits and veggies to have on hand and incorporate into your recipes as substitutions is an excellent way to develop your intuitive cooking practice without becoming overwhelmed. Here are a few foraged items that you could experiment with this Spring for FREE

Fiddleheads

Fiddleheads: 

  • Benefits: High vitamin A, Niacin, Phosphorus, Iron + Vitamin C
  • Storing Guide:  Store in the refrigerator in a container or bag for up to a week or blanch and freeze. 
  • Tips: Blanch for 1 minute. Saute in olive oil or coconut oil + add to 1/2 cup cooked grain/potato + protein. 
  • Note: only available in April + May. 

Hana Rose

for·age – (of a person or animal) search widely for food or provisions.

Garlic Mustard

Garlic Mustard: 

  • Benefits: Vitamin C, Fiber + carotenoids
  • Tips: Sauté in olive oil or coconut oil. For a meal, be sure to pair with vegetables, 1/2 cup cooked grain/potato + a protein. Chop + add to salads
  • Storing Guide: Keep in a vase of water 
  • Note: Harvest upper stem, leaves + flowers.

image

Dandelion Greens: 

  • Benefits: Vitamins K + A & C. Heals, purifies your blood + settles digestion. 
  • Tips: Blanch in boiling water for 20 to 30 seconds. Add to anything, eggs, stew, salad, casseroles or sauté with olive oil or coconut oil. For a meal, be sure to pair with a potato or grain + a protein. 
  • Storing Guide: Rinse gently, pat dry, and store them in plastic bags in refrigerator drawer
  • Note: part of the Sunflower family 

Check out Nicole Cormier on Vimeo for more collaboratory videos. 

with love

 

Featured Lifestyle Recipes

Sourdough

May 7, 2016

A little history about my own digestive issues…I was diagnosed with Irritable Bowl Syndrome since I was 8 years-old. Stomach aches, bloating, distention and long sessions in the bathroom all by myself. As I became Registered Dietitian and created my own nutrition practice, I was able to manage my IBS symptoms through balancing what I chose to eat. As many of you know, I love to cook intuitively with vegetables, fruits, grains and proteins. However, when it comes to baking, well, it’s never been my strong suit. Partly, because I was afraid of feeling sick. I’ve now learned how to incorporate sourdough into my nutrition practice and I’m loving it! 

I’d like to dedicate this post to my friend Tara Laidlaw on Camp Burgess Farm, who was generous in providing me with her family’s fifth generation sourdough starter from San Fransisco, California. Recently, I also received another sourdough starter from my friend, Becky Nadeau (my wedding planner) from Berkshire Mountain Bakery.  They are featured in my new favorite documentary series, Cooked

 


A little bit more about sourdough:

Sourdough is not your typical bread product compared to most. It is made by a long fermentation of dough often derived from generations ago and is the traditional preparation of grains. However, you can create your own sourdough starter using flour and water. The fermentation process uses natural occurring lactobaccilli and yeast. Like many traditions, there are several methods to follow. 

Why do people become attached to their sourdough starters? I had the opportunity to receive a San Fransisco Sourdough starter from a friend, Tara Laidlaw. This starter has been in her family for generations. I automatically felt a level of responsibility. After researching how to care for my starter, I realized, like many do, this “thing” deserves a name. After all, its going to be hanging out in my kitchen, I’m going to be feeding it and it’s going to allow me to bake with it. This was the beginning of a new relationship with “Walter” or “Wally”.  We named our new starter from Berkshire Mountain Bakery, “Susie.” 

Some common practices for serving your starter refreshments or feedings is to use Unbleached, Unbromated Flour and Unchlorinated Water, pay attention to Temperature. To learn more, visit www.CulturesforHealth.com.

Sourdough is a stable culture of lactic acid bacteria and yeast in flour and water with a few health benefits and a mild sour taste.

Potential benefits of sourdough:

  • Easier to digest
  • Lactic acid creates an ideal pH to decrease phytates, which can block the uptake of critical minerals like calcium, magnesium, copper and zinc.
  • Increased amounts of zinc, iron, magnesium, copper and phosphorus
  • Breakdown of gluten and predigestion of starches
  • The acetic acid which is produced along with lactic acid, helps preserve the bread by inhibiting the growth of mold


sourdough2

Ingredients:

Leaven:
1/4 cup Sourdough Starter
1/2 cup Flour
1/3 cup Water

sourdough 4

Dough:
2 1/2 cup spring water
5 1/2 cups Whole Spelt Flour
1 1/2 tsp Sea Salt

sourdough 3

In a mixing bowl, fluff whole spelt flour. Add 1 tsp of Sea Salt to flour and mix. Pour flour and salt mixture into the sourdough, add water and mix until you end up with your sourdough ball.
Place into a bowl and cover for up to 4 hours. To fold, pick up the dough, stretch and then fold the dough. Stretch again in the opposite direction. Do this 4 times. Place back into bowl and cover for 1/2 hour. Complete this 6 times (2 1/2 hours). Let sit undisturbed for 1 hour.

sourdough 5
Gently, divide the dough into 2 balls using a small amount of flour. Let them rest for 30 minutes. Fold each of the loaves again. Place the loaves into bowls and cover, then allow it to sit 3-4 hours.
Preheat your oven to 500 degrees. Place an empty dutch oven with lid on for the last half hour. Pull the dutch oven out of the oven and gently transfer the dough from the colander. Put the lid back on and return to oven and bake for 20 minutes. Remove the lid and allow to bake for 10 additional minutes. Let cool before slicing.

sourdough 6
Don’t forget to save 1/4 cup of sourdough starter for your next batch. You can also save a few extra 1/4 cup sourdough starter jars for your friends!

Sourdough Spelt Bread
This is my simplified method of making sourdough, however to find more details visit: http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-make-sourdough-bread-224367.
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Leaven
  1. 1/4 cup Sourdough Starter
  2. 1/2 cup Flour
  3. 1/3 cup Water
Dough
  1. 2 1/2 cup spring water
  2. 5 1/2 cups Whole Spelt Flour
  3. 1 1/2 tsp Sea Salt
Instructions
  1. In a mixing bowl, fluff whole spelt flour. Add 1 tsp of Sea Salt to flour and mix. Pour flour and salt mixture into the sourdough, add water and mix until you end up with your sourdough ball.
  2. Place into a bowl and cover for up to 4 hours. To fold, pick up the dough, stretch and then fold the dough. Stretch again in the opposite direction. Do this 4 times. Place back into bowl and cover for 1/2 hour. Complete this 6 times (2 1/2 hours). Let sit undisturbed for 1 hour.
  3. Gently, divide the dough into 2 balls using a small amount of flour. Let them rest for 30 minutes. Fold each of the loaves again. Place the loaves into bowls and cover, then allow it to sit 3-4 hours.
  4. Preheat your oven to 500 degrees. Place an empty dutch oven with lid on for the last half hour. Pull the dutch oven out of the oven and gently transfer the dough from the colander. Put the lid back on and return to oven and bake for 20 minutes. Remove the lid and allow to bake for 10 additional minutes. Let cool before slicing.
  5. Don’t forget to save 1/4 cup of sourdough starter for your next batch. You can also save a few extra 1/4 cup sourdough starter jars for your friends!
Adapted from The Kitchn
Adapted from The Kitchn
Nutrition from the Ground Up http://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/
sourdough 7

 

Featured Lifestyle

Skincare Ingredients

May 6, 2016

Beautycounter

In my nutrition counseling, I encourage my clients to think, “If you don’t know what an ingredient is, your body won’t either.” In choosing skincare, it’s a little bit more complicated, because many of the ingredients may easily be naturally foreign to us. In knowing that our skin is our largest organ and absorbs toxins from anything we choose to apply, I decided to look for some answers and support. Here are some simple facts:

  • The United States has not passed a federal law governing the cosmetics industry since 1938.
  • The US has banned or restricted only 11 ingredients to date, while the European Union has banned close to 1,400.
  • Beautycounter has banned over 1,500 ingredients from our products.

Use the NEVER List  as a reference to go through your own products while “Spring Cleaning”: theneverlistbw 8x10

with love

Featured Lifestyle

Spreading the Love: Sherry Dioti

May 1, 2016

This month, I’m happy to share my fourth interview with one of several of my gurus. There are many that challenge us to understand ourselves, grow our spiritual practices and cultivate our lives. This series is to share with you a few of my own personal mentors that whether they are aware of it or not, have made a huge imprint on my life, love and world. 

gu·ru : teacher and especially intellectual guide in matters of fundamental concern. 

Sherry Dioti First, a little bit about what led me to Sherry. This Winter, I went away to Martha’s Vineyard for an amazing intensive Yoga Teacher Training. Yoga came to me just right out of college, even though I had taken a yoga course (for credits) in college. I had just lost my father, living in Boston, in my Dietetic Internship and looking for connection, self-growth and reflection. There were several people that came into my life that inspired me to get into yoga classes. Once I was there, I understood its power (for me). I was so grateful. While I was visiting Martha (the island), I connected with a friend from college that had completed the Fly Yoga School 200-hour Teacher Training. The feelings that percolated during our conversation gave me the powerful impulsion to call Sherry the next day.

Sherry teaches a soulful, fluid and dynamic yoga. We link our breath to our movement, stack poses from basic to more complex, move towards balance between our active and receptive selves, and seek compassion, truth, and acceptance in body mind and spirit. Sherry weaves in the spirit, magic and integrity of the yoga teachings, shamanism and the practice of self-awareness without taking it all too seriously. Each practice is a celebration of life itself.

Fly Yoga School

 Sherry is particularly drawn to the change that is experienced through yoga – the “play” within the body; to use breath and movement, to get to know her Self and her divine nature better; and to purify the body and mind so that true spirit has a place to call home. She is humbled by the process of unfolding – peeling through layers – and is stricken by the sweet power of quiet mind and seat.

Sherry returns people to the earth. She wants to “go there” and urges her students to go with her. She is a true teachers teacher, a leader and a mirror into fearlessness, moving people to move- out of their comfort zones and into the fire for healing. She does so with the heart of a warrior, and the touch of the mother. Reminding us every step of the way that we are already Whole, and that everyone is the Guru.

Sherry Dioti

 What has been your journey into what you do? 

Although I had already taken some yoga classes, yoga truly found me during my pregnancy. I discovered I was pregnant the evening of September 10th, 2001. As you can imagine, waking up the next morning (as a New Yorker) to watch the twin towers go down on the first morning as a future mom was quite alarming. To combat the anxiety of bringing up a child in this time, I decided to go to Prenatal Yoga class, which truly changed my life. The twice weekly classes throughout my pregnancy was a HOME I had not yet felt before in my life. Thus, my first yoga teacher was clearly my son Miles.

When Miles was 4 months old my then-husband and I moved the family to Martha’s Vineyard. I quickly discovered there were no prenatal classes offered on Island, and thus I knew what my dharma was- to be the one to teach. I started offering prenatal yoga when Miles was 8 months old, and created a beautiful community of women in this important life threshold. I can remember clear as day the first woman broke water in class!

Those babies were born and the moms asked me to teach baby & mommy yoga, and then they grew even more and started preschool, and the moms wanted to continue without the babies, so i began to offer Hatha yoga classes open to the public.

My true step-in to sharing yoga as a sacred science happened after I had an injury in my spine. Forced to sit, as it was the only position comfortable to me, I had no choice but to transform my yoga practice from a physical, to a whole science. My meditation practice and study of the teachings through sacred text and subtle body science took hold, landed in me and a new purpose was revealed. In these years of injury, I was able to take the time to create FLY Yoga school.

Sherry Dioti

What have you cultivated along the way? 

Deep respect, all around. Gratitude that the teachings have found me and move through me in a relatable way for others. Respect for whatever is showing up in my life and the ability to sit with others as they feel through there own life happenings. Community and deep sharing with individuals and groups. Self-realization and actualization. SO MUCH MORE!

What inspires you?

My son Miles and all the ways he shape-shifts through his life, and the learning I gain through mothering. I am inspired by people awakening to their truth and so grateful that I am able to share that space with others.

What are the biggest things youve learned? 

Not to run away from my feelings and chase happiness. Seeing the beauty in this sometimes ugly yet beautiful mystery of life. Getting excited about all the ways life presents itself and having a sacred science with an incredible toolbox of practices to guide my way on.

Sherry Dioti

What are your intentions? 

To play whatever part I can in bringing others back HOME to themselves.

How do you feel about your energy?

I have a lot of energy, and I am continually learning how to contain, grow and harvest it for the “Greater Good of All.”

Sherry Dioti

What is your relationship with food? 

It waivers, but I’d say its’ overall a healthy relationship. Sometimes I pay little attention, other than enjoying that I’m blessed to have it. Then I have sparks of excitement around it at times too. I’m not much of a Chef, but i enjoy eating. 

What’s your favorite meal to create for yourself or others or both? 

I eat simply and fairly clean. My favorite meal is a big salad with everything in it. Fresh greens, brown rice, toasted sunflower seeds, beets, kale, whatever other yummy things I can add to make it a meal.

sherry

Who are your favorite teachers? why? 

My son Miles, all the beautiful people who come to practice with me, and my spiritual teachers Saul David Raye and Miguel Angel Vergara. All of these people open doors for me, and remind me of who I am in my essence.

What is your vision board for 2016? 

To scale back a bit to gain insight and take a breather (from travel-teaching, specifically). To continually be re-inspired to practice and share yoga in new platforms. To write more. To enjoy my time in the moment of NOW and spend lots of it in nature.

What’s your favorite book and why?

Light on Life by BKS Iyengar. Such a life affirming memoir on the yogic teachings. I can read it over and over (and I do!)

Sherry Dioti

How do you balance your life? 

I’ve gotten really good at the mantra “just because I can, doesn’t mean I should”. So Ive learned to say “no, thank you” more so that my “yes” is a “hell-yes!”

How do you practice mindfulness?

I try to do this in all my relations, not always successful, but its a practice. I am learning to listen more than I speak and track my feelings and sensations in the moment of the experiences instead of only in hindsight.

Fly Yoga School

What are some thoughts you’d love to share with others?

We are already Whole. And Everyone is the Guru.

Connect with Sherry: 

www.flyyogamv.com
Facebook
Instagram

Thank you for letting us Spread the Love with this month’s inspirational interview. Look forward to next month’s interview with love from, Bridget Pasalacqua, my best friend. Let’s learn to love and be ourselves with the help of each other!

with love