Featured Lifestyle Recipes

Sourdough

May 7, 2016

A little history about my own digestive issues…I was diagnosed with Irritable Bowl Syndrome since I was 8 years-old. Stomach aches, bloating, distention and long sessions in the bathroom all by myself. As I became Registered Dietitian and created my own nutrition practice, I was able to manage my IBS symptoms through balancing what I chose to eat. As many of you know, I love to cook intuitively with vegetables, fruits, grains and proteins. However, when it comes to baking, well, it’s never been my strong suit. Partly, because I was afraid of feeling sick. I’ve now learned how to incorporate sourdough into my nutrition practice and I’m loving it! 

I’d like to dedicate this post to my friend Tara Laidlaw on Camp Burgess Farm, who was generous in providing me with her family’s fifth generation sourdough starter from San Fransisco, California. Recently, I also received another sourdough starter from my friend, Becky Nadeau (my wedding planner) from Berkshire Mountain Bakery.  They are featured in my new favorite documentary series, Cooked

 


A little bit more about sourdough:

Sourdough is not your typical bread product compared to most. It is made by a long fermentation of dough often derived from generations ago and is the traditional preparation of grains. However, you can create your own sourdough starter using flour and water. The fermentation process uses natural occurring lactobaccilli and yeast. Like many traditions, there are several methods to follow. 

Why do people become attached to their sourdough starters? I had the opportunity to receive a San Fransisco Sourdough starter from a friend, Tara Laidlaw. This starter has been in her family for generations. I automatically felt a level of responsibility. After researching how to care for my starter, I realized, like many do, this “thing” deserves a name. After all, its going to be hanging out in my kitchen, I’m going to be feeding it and it’s going to allow me to bake with it. This was the beginning of a new relationship with “Walter” or “Wally”.  We named our new starter from Berkshire Mountain Bakery, “Susie.” 

Some common practices for serving your starter refreshments or feedings is to use Unbleached, Unbromated Flour and Unchlorinated Water, pay attention to Temperature. To learn more, visit www.CulturesforHealth.com.

Sourdough is a stable culture of lactic acid bacteria and yeast in flour and water with a few health benefits and a mild sour taste.

Potential benefits of sourdough:

  • Easier to digest
  • Lactic acid creates an ideal pH to decrease phytates, which can block the uptake of critical minerals like calcium, magnesium, copper and zinc.
  • Increased amounts of zinc, iron, magnesium, copper and phosphorus
  • Breakdown of gluten and predigestion of starches
  • The acetic acid which is produced along with lactic acid, helps preserve the bread by inhibiting the growth of mold


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Ingredients:

Leaven:
1/4 cup Sourdough Starter
1/2 cup Flour
1/3 cup Water

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Dough:
2 1/2 cup spring water
5 1/2 cups Whole Spelt Flour
1 1/2 tsp Sea Salt

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In a mixing bowl, fluff whole spelt flour. Add 1 tsp of Sea Salt to flour and mix. Pour flour and salt mixture into the sourdough, add water and mix until you end up with your sourdough ball.
Place into a bowl and cover for up to 4 hours. To fold, pick up the dough, stretch and then fold the dough. Stretch again in the opposite direction. Do this 4 times. Place back into bowl and cover for 1/2 hour. Complete this 6 times (2 1/2 hours). Let sit undisturbed for 1 hour.

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Gently, divide the dough into 2 balls using a small amount of flour. Let them rest for 30 minutes. Fold each of the loaves again. Place the loaves into bowls and cover, then allow it to sit 3-4 hours.
Preheat your oven to 500 degrees. Place an empty dutch oven with lid on for the last half hour. Pull the dutch oven out of the oven and gently transfer the dough from the colander. Put the lid back on and return to oven and bake for 20 minutes. Remove the lid and allow to bake for 10 additional minutes. Let cool before slicing.

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Don’t forget to save 1/4 cup of sourdough starter for your next batch. You can also save a few extra 1/4 cup sourdough starter jars for your friends!

Sourdough Spelt Bread
This is my simplified method of making sourdough, however to find more details visit: http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-make-sourdough-bread-224367.
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Leaven
  1. 1/4 cup Sourdough Starter
  2. 1/2 cup Flour
  3. 1/3 cup Water
Dough
  1. 2 1/2 cup spring water
  2. 5 1/2 cups Whole Spelt Flour
  3. 1 1/2 tsp Sea Salt
Instructions
  1. In a mixing bowl, fluff whole spelt flour. Add 1 tsp of Sea Salt to flour and mix. Pour flour and salt mixture into the sourdough, add water and mix until you end up with your sourdough ball.
  2. Place into a bowl and cover for up to 4 hours. To fold, pick up the dough, stretch and then fold the dough. Stretch again in the opposite direction. Do this 4 times. Place back into bowl and cover for 1/2 hour. Complete this 6 times (2 1/2 hours). Let sit undisturbed for 1 hour.
  3. Gently, divide the dough into 2 balls using a small amount of flour. Let them rest for 30 minutes. Fold each of the loaves again. Place the loaves into bowls and cover, then allow it to sit 3-4 hours.
  4. Preheat your oven to 500 degrees. Place an empty dutch oven with lid on for the last half hour. Pull the dutch oven out of the oven and gently transfer the dough from the colander. Put the lid back on and return to oven and bake for 20 minutes. Remove the lid and allow to bake for 10 additional minutes. Let cool before slicing.
  5. Don’t forget to save 1/4 cup of sourdough starter for your next batch. You can also save a few extra 1/4 cup sourdough starter jars for your friends!
Adapted from The Kitchn
Adapted from The Kitchn
Nutrition from the Ground Up http://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/
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