Monthly Archives

August 2016

Featured Recipes

Energy Bursts

August 30, 2016

en·er·gy

the strength and vitality required for sustained physical or mental activity.

These are power snacks that contain {Protein} + {Fiber} to balance energy levels + hunger. They are also fabulous to serve for parties that may remind your guests of cute little donut holes. 

Simple Ingredients: 

1 c Hazelnuts or your preferred nut
1 c pepitas
1 c goji berries
1 c chia seeds
1 c coconut (shredded)
1 c maple syrup
6 medjool dates
4 c {Juice Pulp OR grated} – carrot, lemon, ginger & turmeric  

In a food processor outfitted with an “S” blade, or a heavy duty blender, process hazelnuts + pepitas until coarsely ground. Add the dates and goji berries, then process until mixture sticks together. Place into a large mixing bowl, add juice pulp, maple syrup + chia seeds. Form the mixture into two tablespoon size balls and roll in coconut. Makes 16 servings. 

Nurturing Portion = two

Meals-to-go

You can easily throw two energy bursts onto a salad for a quick lunch. Another delicious idea is to add curry to your energy bursts for a spicy change up. We love using these creative nuggets at The Local Juice Bar + Pantry

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with love

Featured Lifestyle

Cultivating a Positive Body Image

August 26, 2016

Body image is defined as “The subjective picture or mental image of one’s own body.” It encompasses one’s own ideas, memories, generalizations, beliefs and feelings surrounding their body. In essence, it’s how you feel in and about your body.

  • A negative body image includes a distorted perception of one’s own shape, feeling uncomfortable in your own body or feeling self-conscious or anxious about your body’s appearance. It also includes negative perceptions like the thin ideal;  the idea that an individual is only attractive when they obtain a certain body size. 
  • A positive body image could be described as a clear and genuine perception of your body’s shape, but it’s also more than that. It’s feeling confident and empowered in your skin, no matter its shape, blemishes, or past. It’s feeling free from the restraints of the thin ideal. You appreciate and celebrate your body for everything it does for you and place little emphasis on physical appearance, whether it be your own or others.

Body image affects everyone; male, female, young and old. In recent years, the media has waged a war on our individual body image. Research has increasingly demonstrated the media’s link to the thin ideal, and it’s seeping deeper into our society, affecting us more and more. According to the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA):

  • 98% of american women are not as thin as fashion models
  • 42% of 1st-3rd graders want to be thinner
  • 81% of 10 year olds are afraid of being fat
  • 70% of 18-30 year olds don’t like their body
  • 60% of those in middle age remain unsatisfied
  • 50% of girls use unhealthy weight control methods such as skipping meals, fasting, smoking, vomiting, or laxative use.
  • 25% of pathological dieters progress to a full blown eating disorder. 

Letting go of the oppressive diet culture:

Diets hold us back on our journey to body positivity as they encourage a restriction mentality and hold food as a token object, one that can be taken away as a form of punishment. Food should never be looked at in this way. We should look towards each meal as a form of nourishment and act of self love. When we eat well and balanced, it is a form of self respect. When we use food as an object of control and degrade our bodies natural urges, that is when we begin to mistreat ourselves and fall into negative and oppressive patterns.

How does our body image affect our nutrition practice?

Our body image affects us in a multitude of ways; socially, emotionally, mentally and behaviorally. People with negative body images are more likely to develop an obsession with weight loss and will go to extremes to obtain their ideal body image. This can be in the form of food restriction, extreme dieting, exercising, etc. All of which can affect our nutrition practice and lead to an imbalance. When we eat and think only in terms of weight loss, we lose the connection between food and health. When we begin to manipulate food in unhealthy ways we look less for nutrients and more for low numbers. Low fat/sugar/calories does not mean it’s healthy and limiting calories does not ensure weight loss. When we think in these definitive ways we give into diet culture and fall out of balance with ourselves.

With a positive body image, one is able to truly cultivate a nutrition practice; one that is based on balance and nurturing each and every cell in your body. Emphasis is on natural and whole foods that will keep your body running smoothly from the inside out, not on low nutrition facts. Positive body image helps one accept what our bodies need to run properly and nourish it completely. Hunger is seen as a sign of self respect, not weakness. Body positive individuals listen to their bodies, understand what they need and accept themselves as they are. Giving up diets and prior idealizations, we are able to truly realize body love.

How to cultivate a positive body image:


We talk about cultivating a nutrition practice, but what about a self-love practice?

Begin with examining your own thoughts, beliefs, attitudes and prejudices about your own body, weight and eating patterns. Can you replace any negative thoughts with positive ones in your own daily life? Here are a few ideas to practice:

  • Practice mindfulness throughout the day, especially during meals and exercising. Eat mindfully, slowly, and in a calm quiet area. Pay attention to your food, thoughts, and nourishing yourself.
  • Think critically about what you see in the media and online. We are bombarded by so much information and images on a daily basis, it’s hard to take the time to examine what’s true and what’s false. 
  • Practice acts of self-love daily. From writing daily affirmations to practicing meditation to yoga and journaling. Find something you love to do and practice it daily.
  • Surround yourself with positive people that lift you up and encourage you to be your best possible self.
  • Wear clothes that represent your true authentic self. Find things that make you feel comfortable and happy.
  • Look at yourself holistically, you may be a work in progress, but that doesn’t mean you can’t love yourself along the way. 

Meal Meditations: 

Before your meal, try a sequence of Sun Salutations: 

Sun salutations are great to do before meals. Thank the sun, the earth, the soil, visualize your garden, a farm, the farmer, the plants growing, rain falling, seeds coming out of the ground + the energy that’s in your food. A lot of hard work has gone into your meal.


Right before your meal, try the Zen Meal Chant: 

First, let us reflect on our own work and the effort of those who brought us this food.
Second, let us be aware of the quality of our deeds as we receive this meal.
Third, what is most essential is the practice of mindfulness, which helps us to transcend greed, anger and delusion.
Fourth, we appreciate this food which sustains the good health of our body and mind.
Fifth, in order to continue our practice for all beings we accept this offering.

meal meditation


During your meal preparation +/or meal time, try a meal meditation: 

Connect with each ingredient in your meal. Observe it in its whole form, feel it, smell it, taste it and most importantly, connect to it. Read how to create your own meal bowls.

meal meditation 2


Books 

How to Eat by Thich Nhat Hanh

Mindful Eating by Rachel Bartholomew + Mandy Pearson

Light on Life by B.K.S. Iyengar


Mindful Moment with Dr. Mary: 

“Allowing for intuitive cooking means being Open, Relaxed, and connecting with the Creative part of yourself.

Open comes when we operate from a ‘judgment-free zone.’ Acceptance of others, of possibilities, of combinations, and of course — of ourselves.

Relaxation comes when one engages in self-care. More than adequate sleep, good nutrition, plenty of water, regular soaks, meditation, progressive relaxation, and exercise.

Creativity comes when you engage in self-acceptance and allow for things to flow.”

~ Mary Acunzo, Ph.D {we’ll be hearing more from Mary in the future!}

 

A special thank you to Olivia Eldridge, a Delicious Living Nutrition intern, for working on this post with me. Olivia is studying Psychology at Emmanuel College in Boston, MA with a strong interest in Eating Disorders and Nutrition. 

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with love

 

 

 

 

 

Featured Lifestyle

Spreading the Love: Bridget Pasalacqua

August 22, 2016

This month, I’m happy to share my fifth interview with a mentor that is one of my best friends. There are many that challenge us to understand ourselves, grow our spiritual practices and cultivate our lives. This series is to share with you a few of my own personal mentors that whether they are aware of it or not, have made a huge imprint on my life, love and world. 

friend

: a person who you like and enjoy being with; a person who helps or supports someone or something (such as a cause or charity)

First, a little bit about our friendship. It started through her husband, an elementary school friend of mine. Mike Pasalacqua was in a band called Bogged Down, and let’s say I was a “big fan”, pretty much groupie status. As I made it to the front of the stage every show, I was surrounded by all of the girlfriends of the band. They made me feel like I was supposed to be there. This show experience created an instant sense of community through music, which became a valuable tool of mine. Every year, our friends come together to travel to the Catskills to the Grey Fox Bluegrass Festival. Bridget and I have bonded through music, growing as individuals, food, gardening, loving life and building our lives everyday. She’s my soul sister. 

 BP1

What has been your journey into what you do?

In hindsight, becoming a nurse was more of a calling than a choice for me. I have worked in several nursing settings such as geriatrics, med-surg and oncology. My mother is a nurse as well and her work ethic is inspiring. Advocating for those in unfortunate situations, is a privilege. Today I am working, as a Case Manager, with an incredible and intelligent team of Registered Nurses and Social Workers. Many are also mothers. The support and life experience they provide is an essential part of doing my job. The obstacles our team faces vary from social to financial issues. Treating each case individually and holistically is key. Working as a Case Manager has opened my eyes to issues in health care such as, the complicated world of health insurance and the economy’s impact on health care.

What have you cultivated along the way? 

Witnessing a multitude of health problems in patients has led me to cultivate a strong connection with nature in order to maintain my health and the health of my family. Living in harmony with the seasons by seeking local produce and honoring natures gifts is very important to me. I have observed the chaos of modern day living and its affect on our health as individuals and society. I have found that actively seeking a mind-body-spirit connection is a beautiful way to live. I too lose myself in the fast passed pressures of life. Cultivating healthy relationships, recipes and body image is a priority. Even more so now that I have a daughter.

BP8

What inspires you?

I am inspired by art, music, nature and inspired most by those who stand up for what is right. By this I mean those who seek truth and aren’t afraid to point out problems as long as the next step is a solution. Together we can do anything! I am blessed to have so may inspirational people to look to. From well known role models such as Jane Goodall to those closest to me such as my husband He manages to work a full time job, come home and work in the garden, brew beer and bee keep to keep us connected with our food and its healing properties. That’s inspiring. The look on my daughters face when she discovers something new, that’s inspiring. How we live is how our children are taught. There is nothing that inspires me to live well more than my daughter.

What are the biggest things youve learned? 

I’ve learned that if you feel passionately about something whether it is art, music, food, the environment, social-economic issues go with it. Follow it. Discuss it. Support it. Perhaps not only are you seeking it but it is seeking you.

BP10

What are your intentions? 

My intentions include making this world a better place for our children. I intend to teach the importance of being connected to and respecting our environment. I intend to practice supporting local farmers, businesses who support fair trade and environmentally friendly products. I intend to support progressive ideas rather than regressive ones. I intend to act out of love rather than fear. I know my daughter is watching. Just the other day I caught her mimicking my yoga poses and deep breathing. She is only 16 months old! I intend to celebrate life with music, good food and friends. I intend to speak out against corporations that continue to put harmful ingredients in our everyday products. Awareness is key. I intend to do all I can to help patients have safe transitions home and will do all in my power to provide them with affordable medications and services. We live in a time where often the best treatment is erroneously unaffordable. I intend to do all I can to make sure everyone has access to quality health care.

How do you feel about your energy?

As far as my energy’s goes, if you read the last paragraph you might say its intense. For the most part I feel that my energy is good. I try to be aware of it and I do hold the belief that it is directly responsible for what comes back to me. In physics energy is a property of objects that can be transformed. I find it interesting that it doesn’t die. Energy can only be transformed. I like to combine science with my spirituality. I suppose that’s part of being a nurse. Our energy is the most important element in shaping our lives. This is why how we fuel it is so important. Conceptualize food on a cellular level. Is the energy provided by an animal that was raised in a small cage or crowded pen and fed GMO wheat with antibiotics equal to the energy provided by an egg laid by your neighbors chicken who roams freely and eats pesky grubs? Choose your fuel. Make no mistake, I will be buying eggs from my neighbor.

BP6

What is your relationship with food? 

I have become very connected to my food. I seek whole food without strange, unpronounceable ingredients. Time spent in my kitchen experimenting with recipes is sacred. Sharing food with friends and family is a blessing. I have made a habit of baking vegan cookies for my daughter. She enjoys watching and licking the spoon and they make a great on the go snack. I don’t partake in supporting the industrialization of our farms. I wasn’t always this way. In the 90s I was all about diet coke and fat free foods. I was overly concerned with being thin and body image. When we step away from commercialized products and seek real nutrition, our lives and energies improve tremendously. I have never felt better. This is a direct result of my relationship with food. Many say, “I cant afford to eat like that”, referring to the avoidance of processed foods. The truth is, we cant afford not to. The long term affects of consuming processed foods and industrialized animal products are devastating not only for the individual but for the environment.

What’s your favorite meal to create for yourself or others or both?

My favorite food to prepare goes with the seasons. In the spring its roasted asparagus. Summer comes and its Swiss chard and fresh eggs, strawberries in salads and blueberry cobbler. In the fall its apple crisp. Winter comes and its savory stews.

BP2

Who are your favorite teachers? why? 

The best teachers are the ones that lead you to the lesson but do not tell you what to think. Bonnie Jefferson is a retired BSN, RN and Patient Care Director that I had the privilege of working under. I believe that we hold many of the same beliefs. She taught me that kindness is more effective then sternness or the infliction of feat will ever be. She is a great leader and role model.

What is your vision board for 2016? 

I plan on remaining true to myself and enjoying the remainder of 2016. Time with family and friends is most important. I plan on watching my daughter grow and learn. I plan on learning with her. What’s better than seeing the world through a child’s eyes? If time provides blogging about being a working mom while homesteading is something I am interested in.

BP3

What’s your favorite book and why?

As far as reading goes, I wish I did it more. My favorite book right now is, Animal Vegetable Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver. It was introduced to me by Mary Jo Feresten an RN Case Manager that I admire for her class, intelligence and kindness. She has raised some very successful children. It is a book about eating with the seasons and is written with passion. I keep, Awakening the Buddha Within by Lama Surya Das at my bedside. A friend, Evan Small who is spiritually focused and lives a lifestyle that most can only dream of, let me borrow it over ten years ago. I couldn’t wait to introduce it to my father who believed that, “Jesus was hip to Buddha.” When my father died, my husband, then boyfriend gave it to me. It really brings the reader inward. I enjoy anything that is thought provoking.

BP5

How do you balance your life? 

Finding balance is challenging. I work 32 hours as a RN Case Manager and have a home, two acres, 16 month old, wheaten terrier, multiple gardens and bees. In order to maintain any kind of balance I must plan ahead. The most important part of my day could very well be that short window of time I’m up before my family. That’s time for coffee and meditation. It helps with balance. Staying inspired also helps keep me balanced.

How do you practice mindfulness?

Mindfulness and balance are two things I’m constantly striving for and admittedly not always able to achieve. Being mindful definitely takes practice. I try to stay present and live in the moment. If my mind spends too much time in the past or future I find myself losing balance. Incorporating yoga and/or meditation into my daily practice has proven to be beneficial. Mindfulness is a daily practice.

BP9

What are some thoughts you’d love to share with others?

I would like to thank my dear friend, teacher, road trip, live music companion and local food enthusiast, Nicole Cormier RD, for providing me with the opportunity to answer some of her questions. She is a constant inspiration.

Connect with Bridget: 

Facebook
Instagram

Thank you for letting us Spread the Love with this month’s inspirational interview. Look forward to next month’s interview with love from, Shawn Vecchione. Let’s learn to love and be ourselves with the help of each other!

with love

Featured Lifestyle Recipes Travel

Off the Grid Newfoundland

August 15, 2016

In November 2015, Shawn + I traveled along the shoreline of Newfoundland for 3 weeks. Newfoundland is a coastal region along the Atlantic, northeast of Maine and Nova Scotia. Much like Cape Cod, the climate is mild and ever-changing. It is famous for its vast landscapes and endless natural beauty. I had a blast posting our new food experiences through social media while traveling off the grid. 

Our Bed

I am excited to share this experience with my readers as a real-life example of how to cook and eat intuitively with the materials around you. I packed a drawer full of supplies (see the picture below for an example of what I brought) and was limited only by my creativity. In addition to these staple foods, I sought out local food sources and harvested wild ingredients. The possibilities of edible plants found in Newfoundland include lots of wild berries, like cranberries, blueberries + partridge berries, several varieties of mint and much more.

Newfoundland Pantry

I did most of my cooking in a cast iron pot and skillet, using a fire as well as a propane burner. I hope this will inspire you to embrace the resourcefulness wherever you are and find intuitive cooking to be an enjoyable process. Sometimes the best method is the simplest method! 

Wild Blueberries

After harvesting blueberries for hours on end, I could incorporate them into our morning routine as much as I wanted. Below are some of our breakfasts you can use as inspiration. 

Buckwheat Blueberry Pancakes
These were a definite favorite breakfast for us. First I made a batch of small round pancakes, however because I only brought a wooden spatula, it was slightly challenging to get a clean flip. So, for the rest of the batter, I made one large pancake that almost filled the skillet. Huge success!! I was asked to repeat this breakfast several times throughout our trip. 
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Ingredients
  1. Lots of Blueberries (use your intuition)
  2. 1 cup buckwheat flour
  3. 1 tablespoon Chia Seeds
  4. 1 tsp Baking Powder
  5. 1/4 tsp Cinnamon + Nutmeg mix
  6. 1 cup of Coconut Milk
  7. 2 TB Coconut Oil
  8. Drizzle of Maple Syrup
Instructions
  1. Mix chia seeds, baking powder, cinnamon + nutmeg and buckwheat flour in a small mixing bowl. Then, mix in coconut milk + blueberries. Melt coconut oil in a skillet, then drop 2 TB of batter into the pan. Let brown on one side, then flip. Drizzle with maple syrup.
Nutrition from the Ground Up http://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/

 Chia Seed French Toast

Chia Seed French Toast
Okay I lied. This was Shawn's favorite recipe. He specifically asked me to mention that he is a "French Toast Guy" + these blew him away.
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Ingredients
  1. 2 slices of Sourdough Bread, sliced in half
  2. 2 TB ChiaSeeds
  3. 1/4 tsp Cinnamon
  4. 1 cup CoconutMilk
  5. 1 TB CoconutOil
  6. 1 TB MapleSyrup
  7. 1/2 cup Blueberries
Instructions
  1. Mix chia seeds, cinnamon + coconut milk in a small bowl. Melt coconut oil in a cast iron skillet over medium heat. Dip each slice of rye front and back into the mix, then place into skillet. Cook until crisp, then flip to repeat on the opposite side. Add maple syrup + 1/2 cup berries.
Nutrition from the Ground Up http://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/
Hibiscus Sun Tea
This was a tea we brought from home that was just sitting in the pantry. You can choose any tea of your choice to lay out in the sun and enjoy over ice or as is. I heated ours up a couple chilly afternoons. 
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Ingredients
  1. 5 tsp Hibiscus Petals
  2. 1/2 gallon Fresh Spring Water
Instructions
  1. Simply let sit out on a sunny day until tea is a desired taste. It takes between 2 - 4 hours. You can use a reusable tea bag or strain the petals after the tea has brewed.
Nutrition from the Ground Up http://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/

 Before traveling, we harvested everything we could in our garden to bring with us. We were able to take some peppers, eggplant and kale. 

Curry Vegetables

Garden Vegetable Curry with Sweet Brown Rice 
This was one of my favorite recipes that I was able to incorporate some vegetables from home + some found at the farms in Newfoundland.
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Ingredients
  1. 2 cups of canned Organic Garbanzo Beans, rinsed
  2. 1 Red Bell Peppers
  3. 1 Yellow Bell Pepper
  4. 2 Carrots
  5. 1 Delicata Squash
  6. 2 Potatoes
  7. 1/2 Onions
  8. 1 cup Yellow Beans
  9. 1 cup Eggplant
  10. Parsley for garnish
  11. Basil for garnish
  12. 1 can of Organic Coconut Milk
  13. 2 heaping spoons of Curry
  14. 2 heaping spoons of Coconut Oil
  15. 1 cup of Sweet Brown Rice
Instructions
  1. Cook rice in 2 cups of water until tender. Saute all vegetables in coconut oil until tender, then add coconut milk, curry and beans. Top with parsley + basil.
Nutrition from the Ground Up http://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/

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Sunshine Squash Hot + Sweet Soup (wing it!)

Guide: Sweet Brown Rice, Sunshine Squash, Delicata Squash, Balsamic Sweet Peppers, Parsley, Bok Choy, Basil, Vegetable Broth, White Beans, Bragg’s, Coconut Oil.  

 

Sunset

 

Newfoundland Wild Salmon Steaks
Most of the licensed fishermen use gill nets to harvest their yearly quota. We were gifted a whole salmon that was accidentally harvested with this year’s cod collection. Lucky me! 
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Ingredients
  1. 1 TB Bragg's Amino Acids
  2. 2 TB Olive Oil
  3. 1 Salmon Steak
Partridge Berry Sauce
  1. 1 TB Coconut Oil
  2. 2 TB Raw Honey
  3. 1/2 tsp Bragg's Amino Acids
  4. 1/2 cup Partridge Berries
  5. dash of turmeric
  6. dash of arrowroot for thickening
Instructions
  1. Pan-sear over medium heat in Olive Oil with Bragg’s Aminos until cooked through, about 5 minutes on each side. In a small pan, heat honey, Bragg's and berries over medium-low heat until sauce consistency. Then, top salmon with sauce.
Nutrition from the Ground Up http://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/

 

Lentil Pepper Stew
Most nights I was preparing dinner with my headlamp.
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Ingredients
  1. 1 cup Whole Blue Lentils
  2. 1 Red Bell Pepper
  3. 1 Yellow Bell Pepper
  4. 1 cup Yellow Beans
  5. 1 Zucchini
  6. 1 Asian Eggplant
  7. 1/2 Onion, chopped
  8. Parsley to garnish
  9. Basil to garnish
  10. Swiss Chard, chopped to garnish
  11. 4 cups Vegetable Broth
  12. 2 TB Red Palm Oil
  13. 2 TB Bragg’s Aminos
  14. 1/4 cup Safflowers
  15. 2 TB Cumin
Instructions
  1. Saute onion in 1 TB red palm oil, then add all vegetables until slightly tender over medium heat. Add broth, aminos, spices + lentils, then simmer until lentils are tender. Garnish with basil, parsley + swiss chard.
Notes
  1. NOTE: these safflowers are not spicy like threads of saffron. They have a sweeter taste and a floral scent to them.
Nutrition from the Ground Up http://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/

Partridge Berries

Before we were heading over to our friend Glen’s house for me to prepare our Salmon feast, I harvested a huge bowl of wild partridge berries to use throughout the meal (salmon glaze, millet dish & a berry crisp). Glen shared that his mother used these berries in her well known, Partridge Berry Pudding. It is definitely a more tart tasting berry compared to the native blueberry. It almost reminds me of a smaller cranberry and often grows in similar locations. 

Newfy Vegetables

The potatoes + carrots were grown in a local’s garden that was shared with us for this meal. Bob, the grower, experienced a huge variation in the size of his potatoes + carrots from year to year. I have to say that they were the sweetest carrots I’ve had compared to during a summer season. The growers here did experience a abnormally cold July, which affected this year’s crops. However, may be the reason for a sweeter carrot. 

Berry Crisp

Partridge + Blueberry Crisp – (wing it!)

Partridge Berries, Blueberries, Raw Honey…. and for the topping…Oats, Chia seeds, Maple Syrup + Cinnamon & Nutmeg Mix. 

Shawn and Tanka

Basil, Gorgonzola + Tomato Grilled Cheese (wing it!)

Sourdough Bread, 2 TB Gorgonzola Cheese, 2 Slices of Heirloom Tomato + 4 Basil Leaves grilled in a cast iron skillet with red palm oil.

Bleu Cheese Grilled Cheese

Cumin Potato Egg Scramble

Peppers, Onions, Potatoes, Cumin, Eggs, Coconut Milk scrambled in a cast iron skillet – A definite one skillet comforting breakfast when the wind is howling.  NOTE: I found it challenging to find local farm fresh eggs at first. However, after asking around I was able to find a local grower that uses all sides of his yard for growing and also had a pristine chicken coop. Score! 

Spicy Eggs

 

Chili

Garden Vegetable Chili

Guide: 1 large jar Web of Life Heirloom Tomatoes, 1/2 jar of Appalachian Naturals Salsa, 2 TB Nobska Farms Hot Sauce, dash Cayenne Pepper, 1 tsp Cumin, Vegetable Broth, 2 heaping spoons of Red Palm Oil, Red, Yellow, Green & Purple Peppers, Yellow Beans, Onions, Delicata Squash, Potatoes, Carrots, Kidney, White + Black Beans

Chili

Fire

Chili

Newfoundland Crab season is in the Spring, however we were so excited to be gifted some that was harvested in season from our local friends. I steamed the thawed crab over the fire in a cast iron skillet. I used a tiny bit of water, hoping not to lose any of its sweet flavor.  It was served with the leftover roasted roots, partridge berry millet that was soon turned into another curry flavored side. I added a can of organic coconut milk, 1 TB Coconut Oil & 1 heaping spoon of curry. This is a great strategic addition to a range of leftovers when camping. 

King Crab

Cod Season is in the Summer months. According to one of my interviews, there are three different licenses Newfoundlanders can carry. They vary in the quota they are allowed to harvest per year. One of the fishermen we spent time with has the lower amount in pounds allowed, however is able to make a living as a fisherman with taking on several part-time work over the years at a local nickel factory and electrical jobs in his area. 

Morning Coffee

Moose hunting season was open during our visit. As we drove in line for the ferry to cross over the ocean into Newfoundland, we saw several hunters in their travels with huge refrigerator systems in the back of their trucks. We were given some local moose meat that was made into sausages and some that was jarred from the beginning of the season. Moose seems to be a sustainable part of the food system, where there are an abundance of these animals around Newfoundland. According to one of the highway signs, there were over 600 car accidents involving moose over the course of last year and over 20 deaths. 

Moose and Potatoes

Local Moose Sausage + Potatoes in a cast iron skillet with a spoonful of olive oil and a teaspoon of my go to Red Door Seasoning. The moose sausage was surprisingly tasty with a little bit of spice to it and reminded me of venison. 

Walks

A local retired couple, Bob & Marg, spend a lot of their time pickling beets, making apple butter + canning moose + even seal. They shared several of their products with us to use throughout our trip including a bottle of Apple Wine, which I was warned to drink slowly (It’s not your average wine in the liquor store). 

Beets  

A local favorite dish is called, Cooked Dinner or Jigg’s Dinner. Similar to our New England “Boiled Dinner” around St. Patrick’s Day, they use their traditional vegetables, cabbage, carrots, turnips and potatoes. The meal is started with a portion of salted beef that is purchased in a bucket. Typically, it is started at 8am in the morning by simmering the salted beef in a pot of water. The first pot of water is dumped and a second is used to continue the flavor process with less sodium concentrated. After a couple hours, the vegetables are then added to the pot to absorb the flavor and cook for a few hours. The next step is adding split peas, which is called pea pudding. It is often served with some type of meat, such as chicken, beef or pork and lots of gravy. 
 

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Below is a blueberry duff, which is a type of steamed pudding, boiled in a cotton bag in the same pot with the vegetables and salt beef in traditional Newfoundland Jigg’s Dinner. 

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Seabuckthorne is a berry that has been known for its rich source of antioxidants. A local was given a batch to freeze and add to his morning smoothies. These beautiful yellow berries are pretty tart, but a small and juicy. 

Seabuckhornes

There are several fruit trees that have grown well here in Newfoundland. A local’s father has developed quite an interest in caring for his fruit trees, including apple, plum and pear trees. 

A spontaneous shoreline rock excursion lead us to an insanely delicious meal for dinner. One of my favorites for sure. We searched in each crevasse in the pools of salt water at low tide. The time Shawn doesn’t surf in this area, due to the reef being dangerously exposed. We found adorable starfish and edible sea urchins, snails and mussels.

Snails

Escargot is a great protein that can be harvested and prepared in minutes. Although you can eat them raw, I prefer to steam them, then simply pull the meat out with anything the size of a toothpick. 

Sea Urchin

We filled our basket with an abundance of protein while tiring ourselves out, jumping from rock to rock. I made a delicious local cabbage salad with radishes from home, added a quartered artichoke hearts, sea salt, fresh ground pepper, then topped it with our steamed sea urchin, mussels and escargot with a balsamic dressing. 

foraging

Sea Cabbage Salad
A fun foraging afternoon inspired this salad that I'll definitely be making at home in the future.
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Ingredients
  1. 1 cup cabbage, shredded
  2. 1 radishes, sliced
  3. 1/2 cup artichoke hearts
  4. dash sea salt
  5. dash ground pepper
  6. 1/2 cup mussels + escargot, steamed
  7. 2 TB Balsamic Dressing
Instructions
  1. Prepare a salad style bowl using all of the above ingredients. Top with mussels + escargot for protein.
Nutrition from the Ground Up http://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/

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Blackberries

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Love

 

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Vegetables

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Barns

 

Waterfalls

 

Breakfast

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Simple Cabbage Salad (wing it!)

Guide: purple cabbage, carrots, onion, beans, olive oil, spices, herbs + a local relish! 

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Thank you for following! 

Nicole + Shawn