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sourdough

Featured Lifestyle Recipes

Sourdough

May 7, 2016

A little history about my own digestive issues…I was diagnosed with Irritable Bowl Syndrome since I was 8 years-old. Stomach aches, bloating, distention and long sessions in the bathroom all by myself. As I became Registered Dietitian and created my own nutrition practice, I was able to manage my IBS symptoms through balancing what I chose to eat. As many of you know, I love to cook intuitively with vegetables, fruits, grains and proteins. However, when it comes to baking, well, it’s never been my strong suit. Partly, because I was afraid of feeling sick. I’ve now learned how to incorporate sourdough into my nutrition practice and I’m loving it! 

I’d like to dedicate this post to my friend Tara Laidlaw on Camp Burgess Farm, who was generous in providing me with her family’s fifth generation sourdough starter from San Fransisco, California. Recently, I also received another sourdough starter from my friend, Becky Nadeau (my wedding planner) from Berkshire Mountain Bakery.  They are featured in my new favorite documentary series, Cooked

 


A little bit more about sourdough:

Sourdough is not your typical bread product compared to most. It is made by a long fermentation of dough often derived from generations ago and is the traditional preparation of grains. However, you can create your own sourdough starter using flour and water. The fermentation process uses natural occurring lactobaccilli and yeast. Like many traditions, there are several methods to follow. 

Why do people become attached to their sourdough starters? I had the opportunity to receive a San Fransisco Sourdough starter from a friend, Tara Laidlaw. This starter has been in her family for generations. I automatically felt a level of responsibility. After researching how to care for my starter, I realized, like many do, this “thing” deserves a name. After all, its going to be hanging out in my kitchen, I’m going to be feeding it and it’s going to allow me to bake with it. This was the beginning of a new relationship with “Walter” or “Wally”.  We named our new starter from Berkshire Mountain Bakery, “Susie.” 

Some common practices for serving your starter refreshments or feedings is to use Unbleached, Unbromated Flour and Unchlorinated Water, pay attention to Temperature. To learn more, visit www.CulturesforHealth.com.

Sourdough is a stable culture of lactic acid bacteria and yeast in flour and water with a few health benefits and a mild sour taste.

Potential benefits of sourdough:

  • Easier to digest
  • Lactic acid creates an ideal pH to decrease phytates, which can block the uptake of critical minerals like calcium, magnesium, copper and zinc.
  • Increased amounts of zinc, iron, magnesium, copper and phosphorus
  • Breakdown of gluten and predigestion of starches
  • The acetic acid which is produced along with lactic acid, helps preserve the bread by inhibiting the growth of mold


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Ingredients:

Leaven:
1/4 cup Sourdough Starter
1/2 cup Flour
1/3 cup Water

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Dough:
2 1/2 cup spring water
5 1/2 cups Whole Spelt Flour
1 1/2 tsp Sea Salt

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In a mixing bowl, fluff whole spelt flour. Add 1 tsp of Sea Salt to flour and mix. Pour flour and salt mixture into the sourdough, add water and mix until you end up with your sourdough ball.
Place into a bowl and cover for up to 4 hours. To fold, pick up the dough, stretch and then fold the dough. Stretch again in the opposite direction. Do this 4 times. Place back into bowl and cover for 1/2 hour. Complete this 6 times (2 1/2 hours). Let sit undisturbed for 1 hour.

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Gently, divide the dough into 2 balls using a small amount of flour. Let them rest for 30 minutes. Fold each of the loaves again. Place the loaves into bowls and cover, then allow it to sit 3-4 hours.
Preheat your oven to 500 degrees. Place an empty dutch oven with lid on for the last half hour. Pull the dutch oven out of the oven and gently transfer the dough from the colander. Put the lid back on and return to oven and bake for 20 minutes. Remove the lid and allow to bake for 10 additional minutes. Let cool before slicing.

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Don’t forget to save 1/4 cup of sourdough starter for your next batch. You can also save a few extra 1/4 cup sourdough starter jars for your friends!

Sourdough Spelt Bread
This is my simplified method of making sourdough, however to find more details visit: http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-make-sourdough-bread-224367.
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Leaven
  1. 1/4 cup Sourdough Starter
  2. 1/2 cup Flour
  3. 1/3 cup Water
Dough
  1. 2 1/2 cup spring water
  2. 5 1/2 cups Whole Spelt Flour
  3. 1 1/2 tsp Sea Salt
Instructions
  1. In a mixing bowl, fluff whole spelt flour. Add 1 tsp of Sea Salt to flour and mix. Pour flour and salt mixture into the sourdough, add water and mix until you end up with your sourdough ball.
  2. Place into a bowl and cover for up to 4 hours. To fold, pick up the dough, stretch and then fold the dough. Stretch again in the opposite direction. Do this 4 times. Place back into bowl and cover for 1/2 hour. Complete this 6 times (2 1/2 hours). Let sit undisturbed for 1 hour.
  3. Gently, divide the dough into 2 balls using a small amount of flour. Let them rest for 30 minutes. Fold each of the loaves again. Place the loaves into bowls and cover, then allow it to sit 3-4 hours.
  4. Preheat your oven to 500 degrees. Place an empty dutch oven with lid on for the last half hour. Pull the dutch oven out of the oven and gently transfer the dough from the colander. Put the lid back on and return to oven and bake for 20 minutes. Remove the lid and allow to bake for 10 additional minutes. Let cool before slicing.
  5. Don’t forget to save 1/4 cup of sourdough starter for your next batch. You can also save a few extra 1/4 cup sourdough starter jars for your friends!
Adapted from The Kitchn
Adapted from The Kitchn
Nutrition from the Ground Up http://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/
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Featured Recipes

Kimchi

December 16, 2016

Kimchi

Korean Cookery. a spicy fermented mixture containing cabbage, onions, and sometimes fish, variously seasons, as with garlic, horseradish, red peppers, and ginger.

Why add it to your meals? 

Kimchi is full of beneficial microbes for your gut health. Microbes help us digest and clear out toxins (boosting immunity). There are some studies that also show when eating meat with kimchi, less inflammatory markers are present. Most Americans don’t have all of the microbes we should in our GI tract, therefore adding 2 T of Kimchi to your meal will help you digest your food and send lots of lactobacilli bacteria (GOOD) to your inner eco-system. 

GUT HEALTH = physical, mental, and emotional well-being

Kimchi is high in Vitamin C + A. It can also produce amino acids, absorb minerals, and eliminate toxins. So what are we waiting for? 

There are over 300 different recipes for Kimchi and not any two taste exactly the same due to the fermentation process. You can intuitively make one your own with different herbs, seasonal vegetables and spices.

The two ingredients I chose to start with are Cabbage + Daikon Radish. 

Napa Cabbage: 

  • Vitamin K,  C & B6
  • Potassium, phosphorus, Calcium & magnesium

Daikon Radish: 

  • Vitamins A, C, E & B-6
  • Potassium, Magnesium, Calcium & Iron

Add your own: 
ginger
scallions
garlic 
onions
shallots
Coriander Seeds 


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Start slicing your cabbage and any other vegetables you choose. I recommend going to the farmers’ market to scope out what’s available. 

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You’ll need a bigger pot to massage all of your ingredients. Sprinkle a good quality sea salt (without anti-caking agents)  + organic red pepper flakes over your ingredients and let sit for a couple minutes.

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You’ll notice that your cabbage will start sweating. It’s time! Connect your hands to your ingredients and start massaging for at least 5 minutes. 

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The juices will build up and when you intuitively feel it is enough, pour everything into mason jars, a large glass jar or a fermenting crock. Make sure liquid is covering the ingredients. 

Kimchi

“To ferment your own food is to lodge a small but eloquent protest – on behalf of the senses and the microbes – against the homogenization of flavors and food experiences now rolling like a great, undifferentiated lawn across the globe. It is also a declaration of independence from an economy that would much prefer we remain passive consumers of its standardized commodities, rather than creators of idiosyncratic products expressive of ourselves and of the places where we live, because your pale ale or sourdough bread or kimchi is going to taste nothing like mine or anyone else’s.”
Michael Pollan, Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation

kimchi

When you are ready to cover, you can place a larger cabbage leaf on the top to help keep fluids covering ingredients. With your hands, push ingredients down into the jar to release as much oxygen as possible.  You may need a weight to hold the ingredients down.  Leave for 3 – 5 days, burping each day (opening the jar) or until taste is desired. 

with love

 

 

Featured Lifestyle Recipes Travel

Off the Grid Newfoundland

August 15, 2016

In November 2015, Shawn + I traveled along the shoreline of Newfoundland for 3 weeks. Newfoundland is a coastal region along the Atlantic, northeast of Maine and Nova Scotia. Much like Cape Cod, the climate is mild and ever-changing. It is famous for its vast landscapes and endless natural beauty. I had a blast posting our new food experiences through social media while traveling off the grid. 

Our Bed

I am excited to share this experience with my readers as a real-life example of how to cook and eat intuitively with the materials around you. I packed a drawer full of supplies (see the picture below for an example of what I brought) and was limited only by my creativity. In addition to these staple foods, I sought out local food sources and harvested wild ingredients. The possibilities of edible plants found in Newfoundland include lots of wild berries, like cranberries, blueberries + partridge berries, several varieties of mint and much more.

Newfoundland Pantry

I did most of my cooking in a cast iron pot and skillet, using a fire as well as a propane burner. I hope this will inspire you to embrace the resourcefulness wherever you are and find intuitive cooking to be an enjoyable process. Sometimes the best method is the simplest method! 

Wild Blueberries

After harvesting blueberries for hours on end, I could incorporate them into our morning routine as much as I wanted. Below are some of our breakfasts you can use as inspiration. 

Buckwheat Blueberry Pancakes
These were a definite favorite breakfast for us. First I made a batch of small round pancakes, however because I only brought a wooden spatula, it was slightly challenging to get a clean flip. So, for the rest of the batter, I made one large pancake that almost filled the skillet. Huge success!! I was asked to repeat this breakfast several times throughout our trip. 
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Ingredients
  1. Lots of Blueberries (use your intuition)
  2. 1 cup buckwheat flour
  3. 1 tablespoon Chia Seeds
  4. 1 tsp Baking Powder
  5. 1/4 tsp Cinnamon + Nutmeg mix
  6. 1 cup of Coconut Milk
  7. 2 TB Coconut Oil
  8. Drizzle of Maple Syrup
Instructions
  1. Mix chia seeds, baking powder, cinnamon + nutmeg and buckwheat flour in a small mixing bowl. Then, mix in coconut milk + blueberries. Melt coconut oil in a skillet, then drop 2 TB of batter into the pan. Let brown on one side, then flip. Drizzle with maple syrup.
Nutrition from the Ground Up http://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/

 Chia Seed French Toast

Chia Seed French Toast
Okay I lied. This was Shawn's favorite recipe. He specifically asked me to mention that he is a "French Toast Guy" + these blew him away.
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Ingredients
  1. 2 slices of Sourdough Bread, sliced in half
  2. 2 TB ChiaSeeds
  3. 1/4 tsp Cinnamon
  4. 1 cup CoconutMilk
  5. 1 TB CoconutOil
  6. 1 TB MapleSyrup
  7. 1/2 cup Blueberries
Instructions
  1. Mix chia seeds, cinnamon + coconut milk in a small bowl. Melt coconut oil in a cast iron skillet over medium heat. Dip each slice of rye front and back into the mix, then place into skillet. Cook until crisp, then flip to repeat on the opposite side. Add maple syrup + 1/2 cup berries.
Nutrition from the Ground Up http://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/
Hibiscus Sun Tea
This was a tea we brought from home that was just sitting in the pantry. You can choose any tea of your choice to lay out in the sun and enjoy over ice or as is. I heated ours up a couple chilly afternoons. 
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Ingredients
  1. 5 tsp Hibiscus Petals
  2. 1/2 gallon Fresh Spring Water
Instructions
  1. Simply let sit out on a sunny day until tea is a desired taste. It takes between 2 - 4 hours. You can use a reusable tea bag or strain the petals after the tea has brewed.
Nutrition from the Ground Up http://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/

 Before traveling, we harvested everything we could in our garden to bring with us. We were able to take some peppers, eggplant and kale. 

Curry Vegetables

Garden Vegetable Curry with Sweet Brown Rice 
This was one of my favorite recipes that I was able to incorporate some vegetables from home + some found at the farms in Newfoundland.
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Ingredients
  1. 2 cups of canned Organic Garbanzo Beans, rinsed
  2. 1 Red Bell Peppers
  3. 1 Yellow Bell Pepper
  4. 2 Carrots
  5. 1 Delicata Squash
  6. 2 Potatoes
  7. 1/2 Onions
  8. 1 cup Yellow Beans
  9. 1 cup Eggplant
  10. Parsley for garnish
  11. Basil for garnish
  12. 1 can of Organic Coconut Milk
  13. 2 heaping spoons of Curry
  14. 2 heaping spoons of Coconut Oil
  15. 1 cup of Sweet Brown Rice
Instructions
  1. Cook rice in 2 cups of water until tender. Saute all vegetables in coconut oil until tender, then add coconut milk, curry and beans. Top with parsley + basil.
Nutrition from the Ground Up http://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/

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Sunshine Squash Hot + Sweet Soup (wing it!)

Guide: Sweet Brown Rice, Sunshine Squash, Delicata Squash, Balsamic Sweet Peppers, Parsley, Bok Choy, Basil, Vegetable Broth, White Beans, Bragg’s, Coconut Oil.  

 

Sunset

 

Newfoundland Wild Salmon Steaks
Most of the licensed fishermen use gill nets to harvest their yearly quota. We were gifted a whole salmon that was accidentally harvested with this year’s cod collection. Lucky me! 
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Ingredients
  1. 1 TB Bragg's Amino Acids
  2. 2 TB Olive Oil
  3. 1 Salmon Steak
Partridge Berry Sauce
  1. 1 TB Coconut Oil
  2. 2 TB Raw Honey
  3. 1/2 tsp Bragg's Amino Acids
  4. 1/2 cup Partridge Berries
  5. dash of turmeric
  6. dash of arrowroot for thickening
Instructions
  1. Pan-sear over medium heat in Olive Oil with Bragg’s Aminos until cooked through, about 5 minutes on each side. In a small pan, heat honey, Bragg's and berries over medium-low heat until sauce consistency. Then, top salmon with sauce.
Nutrition from the Ground Up http://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/

 

Lentil Pepper Stew
Most nights I was preparing dinner with my headlamp.
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Ingredients
  1. 1 cup Whole Blue Lentils
  2. 1 Red Bell Pepper
  3. 1 Yellow Bell Pepper
  4. 1 cup Yellow Beans
  5. 1 Zucchini
  6. 1 Asian Eggplant
  7. 1/2 Onion, chopped
  8. Parsley to garnish
  9. Basil to garnish
  10. Swiss Chard, chopped to garnish
  11. 4 cups Vegetable Broth
  12. 2 TB Red Palm Oil
  13. 2 TB Bragg’s Aminos
  14. 1/4 cup Safflowers
  15. 2 TB Cumin
Instructions
  1. Saute onion in 1 TB red palm oil, then add all vegetables until slightly tender over medium heat. Add broth, aminos, spices + lentils, then simmer until lentils are tender. Garnish with basil, parsley + swiss chard.
Notes
  1. NOTE: these safflowers are not spicy like threads of saffron. They have a sweeter taste and a floral scent to them.
Nutrition from the Ground Up http://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/

Partridge Berries

Before we were heading over to our friend Glen’s house for me to prepare our Salmon feast, I harvested a huge bowl of wild partridge berries to use throughout the meal (salmon glaze, millet dish & a berry crisp). Glen shared that his mother used these berries in her well known, Partridge Berry Pudding. It is definitely a more tart tasting berry compared to the native blueberry. It almost reminds me of a smaller cranberry and often grows in similar locations. 

Newfy Vegetables

The potatoes + carrots were grown in a local’s garden that was shared with us for this meal. Bob, the grower, experienced a huge variation in the size of his potatoes + carrots from year to year. I have to say that they were the sweetest carrots I’ve had compared to during a summer season. The growers here did experience a abnormally cold July, which affected this year’s crops. However, may be the reason for a sweeter carrot. 

Berry Crisp

Partridge + Blueberry Crisp – (wing it!)

Partridge Berries, Blueberries, Raw Honey…. and for the topping…Oats, Chia seeds, Maple Syrup + Cinnamon & Nutmeg Mix. 

Shawn and Tanka

Basil, Gorgonzola + Tomato Grilled Cheese (wing it!)

Sourdough Bread, 2 TB Gorgonzola Cheese, 2 Slices of Heirloom Tomato + 4 Basil Leaves grilled in a cast iron skillet with red palm oil.

Bleu Cheese Grilled Cheese

Cumin Potato Egg Scramble

Peppers, Onions, Potatoes, Cumin, Eggs, Coconut Milk scrambled in a cast iron skillet – A definite one skillet comforting breakfast when the wind is howling.  NOTE: I found it challenging to find local farm fresh eggs at first. However, after asking around I was able to find a local grower that uses all sides of his yard for growing and also had a pristine chicken coop. Score! 

Spicy Eggs

 

Chili

Garden Vegetable Chili

Guide: 1 large jar Web of Life Heirloom Tomatoes, 1/2 jar of Appalachian Naturals Salsa, 2 TB Nobska Farms Hot Sauce, dash Cayenne Pepper, 1 tsp Cumin, Vegetable Broth, 2 heaping spoons of Red Palm Oil, Red, Yellow, Green & Purple Peppers, Yellow Beans, Onions, Delicata Squash, Potatoes, Carrots, Kidney, White + Black Beans

Chili

Fire

Chili

Newfoundland Crab season is in the Spring, however we were so excited to be gifted some that was harvested in season from our local friends. I steamed the thawed crab over the fire in a cast iron skillet. I used a tiny bit of water, hoping not to lose any of its sweet flavor.  It was served with the leftover roasted roots, partridge berry millet that was soon turned into another curry flavored side. I added a can of organic coconut milk, 1 TB Coconut Oil & 1 heaping spoon of curry. This is a great strategic addition to a range of leftovers when camping. 

King Crab

Cod Season is in the Summer months. According to one of my interviews, there are three different licenses Newfoundlanders can carry. They vary in the quota they are allowed to harvest per year. One of the fishermen we spent time with has the lower amount in pounds allowed, however is able to make a living as a fisherman with taking on several part-time work over the years at a local nickel factory and electrical jobs in his area. 

Morning Coffee

Moose hunting season was open during our visit. As we drove in line for the ferry to cross over the ocean into Newfoundland, we saw several hunters in their travels with huge refrigerator systems in the back of their trucks. We were given some local moose meat that was made into sausages and some that was jarred from the beginning of the season. Moose seems to be a sustainable part of the food system, where there are an abundance of these animals around Newfoundland. According to one of the highway signs, there were over 600 car accidents involving moose over the course of last year and over 20 deaths. 

Moose and Potatoes

Local Moose Sausage + Potatoes in a cast iron skillet with a spoonful of olive oil and a teaspoon of my go to Red Door Seasoning. The moose sausage was surprisingly tasty with a little bit of spice to it and reminded me of venison. 

Walks

A local retired couple, Bob & Marg, spend a lot of their time pickling beets, making apple butter + canning moose + even seal. They shared several of their products with us to use throughout our trip including a bottle of Apple Wine, which I was warned to drink slowly (It’s not your average wine in the liquor store). 

Beets  

A local favorite dish is called, Cooked Dinner or Jigg’s Dinner. Similar to our New England “Boiled Dinner” around St. Patrick’s Day, they use their traditional vegetables, cabbage, carrots, turnips and potatoes. The meal is started with a portion of salted beef that is purchased in a bucket. Typically, it is started at 8am in the morning by simmering the salted beef in a pot of water. The first pot of water is dumped and a second is used to continue the flavor process with less sodium concentrated. After a couple hours, the vegetables are then added to the pot to absorb the flavor and cook for a few hours. The next step is adding split peas, which is called pea pudding. It is often served with some type of meat, such as chicken, beef or pork and lots of gravy. 
 

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Below is a blueberry duff, which is a type of steamed pudding, boiled in a cotton bag in the same pot with the vegetables and salt beef in traditional Newfoundland Jigg’s Dinner. 

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Seabuckthorne is a berry that has been known for its rich source of antioxidants. A local was given a batch to freeze and add to his morning smoothies. These beautiful yellow berries are pretty tart, but a small and juicy. 

Seabuckhornes

There are several fruit trees that have grown well here in Newfoundland. A local’s father has developed quite an interest in caring for his fruit trees, including apple, plum and pear trees. 

A spontaneous shoreline rock excursion lead us to an insanely delicious meal for dinner. One of my favorites for sure. We searched in each crevasse in the pools of salt water at low tide. The time Shawn doesn’t surf in this area, due to the reef being dangerously exposed. We found adorable starfish and edible sea urchins, snails and mussels.

Snails

Escargot is a great protein that can be harvested and prepared in minutes. Although you can eat them raw, I prefer to steam them, then simply pull the meat out with anything the size of a toothpick. 

Sea Urchin

We filled our basket with an abundance of protein while tiring ourselves out, jumping from rock to rock. I made a delicious local cabbage salad with radishes from home, added a quartered artichoke hearts, sea salt, fresh ground pepper, then topped it with our steamed sea urchin, mussels and escargot with a balsamic dressing. 

foraging

Sea Cabbage Salad
A fun foraging afternoon inspired this salad that I'll definitely be making at home in the future.
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Ingredients
  1. 1 cup cabbage, shredded
  2. 1 radishes, sliced
  3. 1/2 cup artichoke hearts
  4. dash sea salt
  5. dash ground pepper
  6. 1/2 cup mussels + escargot, steamed
  7. 2 TB Balsamic Dressing
Instructions
  1. Prepare a salad style bowl using all of the above ingredients. Top with mussels + escargot for protein.
Nutrition from the Ground Up http://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/

During an off-trail adventure, we ran into a blackberry patch, which was the perfect afternoon snack to load up. 

Blackberries

A near by running river and fresh water pool has been our go to spot for cleaning up throughout the camping trip. During my several minutes of convincing myself to dive in, I spotted a raspberry patch on the side of the pool. 

Cumin Cabbage + Carrots with Raisins over Spaghetti Squash

1 can of Organic Coconut Milk + 4 TB Cumin, Carrots, Cabbage, 3 TB Organic Raisins, 1 TB Turmeric, dash of Sea Salt, 1 TB Bragg’s Aminos, 1 cup Millet, 2 Potatoes, 1 cup Sunshine Squash, 2 Onions, 2 cups Vegetable Broth. 

Spaghetti Squash Curry

Love

 

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Vegetables

 Sautéed Beets + Artichokes on Toast

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Barns

 

Waterfalls

 

Breakfast

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Simple Cabbage Salad (wing it!)

Guide: purple cabbage, carrots, onion, beans, olive oil, spices, herbs + a local relish! 

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We couldn’t go the trip without a classic PB + J! (local jam + natural PB)

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Thank you for following! 

Nicole + Shawn

Featured Recipes

Sprouts

May 26, 2016

Sprouts are the first shoots of a plant and are tender, delicate, tasty, and highly nutritious.  They are new life awakening.  Once sprouted, our bodies can better absorb essential nutrients like iron, calcium, amino acids, B vitamins, and vitamin C.  When plants are sprouted they are also easier to digest, in their simple sugar and amino acid form.  Sprouts are delicious any time of the year but make for a great source of nutrients and freshness during the early Spring months.  Early Spring gardening is about hardy greens and delicate sprouts, providing the bare essential nutrients needed for keeping our bodies ad minds healthy when fresh food, sunlight, and movement are in shorter supply.

sprouts

You can purchase sprouted grains at various food stores but you can just as easily do it yourself!  It’s an easy process, offers you fresh and healthy food, and can be a fun project to try.  Sprouts are so good because the biochemical changes that occur during the sprouting process allow them to be more digestible and increase their vitamin content.  For example, the sprouted mung bean has the simple carbohydrate content of a melon, the vitamin A of a lemon, the thiamin of an avocado, and the list goes on.

sprouts

You can sprout many things! Try grains, seeds, or beans.  For grains, first, find the whole grain you’d like to try sprouting.  You can choose any that still has the germ and bran and has not been altered yet.  For example, amaranth, barley, buckwheat, corn, einkorn, farro, kumut, millet, quinoa, rice, rye berry, sorghum, spelt, or wheatberry all will do the trick.  Try these simple steps:

What to gather: 

1-quart mason jar
Cheese cloth or screen (to allow water and air through)
Metal band or rubber band to secure cover
½ cup of grain
Water

1. Rinse and drain the grains
2. Place the grains in a bowl of water, covered a couple of inches, and soak overnight to release enzyme inhibitors
3. Drain the grains and rinse again with cool water
4. Place the grains in the jar and cover
5. Turn the jar upside down and angled  so that air can circulate in and water can drain out
6. Every 12 hours or so rinse the grains with water, drain, and return to the upside-down position
7. Continue step 6 until your grains have sprouted, rinse again, store in the refrigerator, and enjoy!

You can also try sprouting seeds and beans with a similar process! To calculate your bean-to-sprout ratio follow these simple guidelines:

1 lb of small seeds = 20 liters
1/4 cup of beans = 1 liter

TIP: Use 1 TB of seeds OR 1/8 cup of beans to make 2 cups of sprouts

Lentils

Now, you can sprout pretty much anything- try one of the following: alfalfa, broccoli, sunflower, radish, lentils, mung beans, peas, arugula, beets, adukzi beans, clover, mustard, garlic chive, garbanzo, cabbage, quinoa, pumpkin, hemp, chia, garlic, or leeks.

1. Fill a mason jar or bowl with cool water and soak your beans or seeds for 4-12 hours, covered with a cloth
2.Rise and drain with cool water, cover with a cloth, set in a dark place for 2-5 days, rinsing and draining every 12 hours
3. After 3-5 day when sprouts are desired height, set in the sunlight for a day to increase the chlorophyll content
4. Harvest when sprouts are 1-2 inches long with delicate green leave; enjoy within 4 days 

Any of these sprouts can be added to salads, soups, stir-fry’s for a yummy taste, texture, and health boost.  Think outside the box and try your newly sprouted grains at all meals of the day, even dessert! You can also bake with them, dry them, or make them into flour.

Beans

FOOD SOAKING TIME  SPROUTING TIME (days)
Almonds 8-12 No Sprouting (if pasteurized) 3 Days (raw)
Adzuki Beans 8-12 4
Amaranth 8 2-3
Barley 6 2
Black Beans 8-12 3
Brazil Nuts 3 No Sprouting
Buckwheat 6 2-3
Cashews 2-4 No Sprouting
Garbanzo 8 3-4 
Flaxseeds ½ No Sprouting
Hazelnuts 8-12 No Sprouting
Kamut 7 2-3
Lentils 7 2-3
Macadamias 2 No Sprouting
Millet 5 1
Mung Beans 8-12 4
Oat Groats 6 2-3
Pecans 6 No Sprouting
Pistachios 8 No Sprouting
Pumpkin Seeds 8 3
Radish Seeds 8-12 3-4
Sesame Seeds 8 2-3
Sunflower Seeds 8 1
Quinoa 4 2-3
Walnuts 4 No Sprouting
Wheat Berries 7 3-4
Wild Rice 9 3-5

Try out some of these recipes, great ways to enjoy these gorgeous little sprouts!  

Shiitake Lettuce Cups
You may intuitively create your own lettuce cups. Bring together a protein with your choice of seasonal vegetables. You may also like to add 1/2 cup of cooked grain to each serving.
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Ingredients
  1. 1 cup Shiitake mushrooms, sliced
  2. 1 TB Srirachi sauce
  3. 2 TB Unfiltered Apple Cider Vinegar
  4. 2 TB Bragg's Aminos
  5. 2 TB Dijon mustard
  6. 1 block Tempeh, crumbled
  7. 1 cup Broccoli Sprouts
  8. 1 TB Coconut Oil
  9. 1/2 cup Shredded Carrots
  10. 1/2 cup Onions, sliced
  11. 1 TB Sesame Oil
  12. 1 head Boston Lettuce
  13. 2 cloves garlic, chopped
Instructions
  1. In a large frying pan, heat palm oil and sauté tempeh, mushrooms, onions, srirachi sauce & garlic. Cook for 10 minutes, covered. In a mason jar or small bowl, mix dressing using tamari, mustard, vinegar & sesame oil. Place tempeh mixture into each lettuce cup, then drizzle dressing and top with carrots & broccoli sprouts. To finish, drizzle more srirachi sauce. Serves two for dinner or four for an appetizer.
Nutrition from the Ground Up http://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/
Fresh Shrimp Vegetable Spring Rolls
You can also intuitively design your own spring rolls with a different protein and vegetables with what you have in your kitchen.
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Ingredients
  1. 8 spring roll rice papers
  2. 16 shrimp, sautéed in red palm oil
  3. 1 cup pea greens or any greens
  4. 1 cup chinese rose radish sprouts or any sprouts
  5. 1 cup carrots, shredded
  6. 1/2 cup mushrooms, sliced
  7. 1 cup asparagus, chopped
  8. 1/2 cup water chestnuts, sliced
  9. 12 fresh mint leaves
Instructions
  1. Fill a large mixing bowl with warm water, then submerge one paper into water until it feels extremely flexible. Remove from water and let drip over bowl, then place onto cutting board. Lay mint leaves in a row horizontally across. Top with all other ingredients, accept shrimp. Lay shrimp in a row horizontally across. Pull inwards both sides, then lift side closest to you, folding it over in the opposite direction until it creates a roll shown in picture.
Nutrition from the Ground Up http://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/

 Or just a simple Sprouted Sandwich:

1 cup of sprouts
1 TB Avocado
2 TB hummus
1 fried or poached egg
2 slices of homemade Sourdough or a Sprouted Grain Bread

with love

Recipes

December 1, 2015

The recipes on my website are nutritionally-complete, easy to replicate and invite unique innovation to grow your own nutrition practice. Some of them are healthy additions to support digestion, such as Kimchi. These snacks, meals and drinks are designed to make you feel good and promote engagement with your nutrition practice.

I have found that one of the difficulties many people, including my clients, have with following recipes is that they feel set in stone. My recipes are not so. In order to encourage you to embrace intuitive cooking, the recipes you find here are chock full of possibilities. I offer suggestions for substitutions, alternatives and turning each recipe into your very own creation.

I provide the health benefits and general nutritional information with each recipe so that you can create with confidence and use knowledge to your advantage in your pursuit of a healthy lifestyle.

Breakfast

Mix N Match Jars

Snack Smart

Kimchi

Oysters

Sprouts

Sourdough

Energy Bursts

Cauliflower Grits

Fermentation