Monthly Archives

December 2016

Featured Lifestyle

10 Things to Consider for your Nutrition Practice

December 31, 2016

Practice:

: to do (something) regularly or constantly as an ordinary part of your life

: the activity of doing something again and again in order to become better at it

Nutrition:

:  the act or process of nourishing or being nourished

Going forward one year, I thought I would share my own personal practice + re-rooting activities. 

A few basics: 

1. Morning Routine

Take two minutes of stillness. Journal one page.  Eat breakfast every day with protein, whole grain OR potato & fruit or vegetables. This killer combo sets the tone for managing your blood sugars, energy level and hunger throughout the day. Below is Oatmeal + Sunflower Butter + Mint + Ginger + Cinnamon + Banana. 

2. Hydrate

Drink more than 8 cups of water per day to help your body efficiently flush toxins and better absorb nutrients. Start with apple cider vinegar, lemon & spice H20. Make lots of tea. Rosemary + Ginger + Honey + Turmeric + Apple Cider Vinegar + Garlic + Lime. 


3. Add Greens + Fiber

Eat more than 5 FULL cups of vegetables and fruits a day. Emphasize veggies! During the winter months roasting seasonal vegetables are an easy and flavorful option. Also, adding greens to any recipe –  salad, soup, chili or stew.


4. Meal Meditations

During your meal preparation +/or meal time, try a meal meditation: 

Connect with each ingredient in your meal. Observe it in its whole form, feel it, smell it, taste it and most importantly, connect to it. Read how to create your own meal bowls.

Silent Meal Meditation Classes begin in March + April at The Local Juice12 – 1 PM WEDNESDAYS. Please contact for more information.


5. Snacking 

Eat a balanced snack. Always pair protein and fiber – and try to eat what’s in season. For example, a pear with a handful of almonds, apple slices with natural peanut or almond butter, or raw yogurt with pomegranates. Use the chart below to assemble your own combos. 

Protein Fiber
Nuts (1/4 c) Apple
Seeds (1/4 c) Persimmon
Nut Butter (1 – 2 TB) Pomagranate
Energy Burst  Carrots
Yogurt (1/2 – 1 c) Cauliflower
Lentils (1/2 c) Green Beans
Beans (1/2 c) Celery
Chickpeas (1/2 c) Any Fruit
Smoothie (Protein + Fruit + Greens) Any Vegetable
Raw Milk Cheese (1 oz) Whole Grain Crackers

To open your pomagranate:

Place under water, then break open to release the seeds from the membrane. 


6. Make an appointment for a Kitchen Therapy session once per week: 

Have a sit still & rejuvenate day at home.  Kitchen therapy:  Prepare what I need for a supportive week. 1) make a batch of grains {polenta, spelt berries, wild rice} 2) cook vegetables 3) make greens readily available 4) prepare proteins 5) make tea 


7. Expand your relationships.

It will be my First New Year Married – Love, relate & meditate 2017. Excited to learn more about meditation in the next year. Spending time with my new family, exploring more functional nutrition & health, sharing our landing space & expanding our sustainable living. 


8. Travel – Inspirational trips

My first personal inspirational trip will be to India – {Stay tuned for the travel posts about farming, culinary & daily lessons}

Be in love with your life. Every minute of it. – Jack Kerouac

9. Shop more consciously. Below are the links to where my above travel items stemmed from. 

Devinto Design Leggings & Underwear 

Wellfleet Clothing Swap 

Dumptique Martha’s Vineyard

Homegrown Trades 

Shift 

Wind-born Journal

Artichoke Bathing Suit (+ socks)


10. Join our NFTGU Community – HUGE NEWS!!!! 

The first issue of Nutrition from the Ground Up guide is coming! 

Get the basics of structuring a nutrition practice, from nutritional building blocks to pantry design. nutritionally complete recipe suggestions with substitution ideas to encourage your intuitive cooking practice to grow – including smart snacks and quick meals. My seasonal produce picks will inspire you to use what’s fresh now. There will be mindful moments that recognize and strengthen the mind / body connection between you, your nutrition practice, and your overall well-being.

Featured Recipes

Yogurt

December 26, 2016

yo·gurt

a semisolid sourish food prepared from milk fermented by added bacteria.

Yogurt contains many vitamins and nutrients that have positive implications for your health. Nutrients include B12, riboflavin, magnesium, calcium, and potassium, all of which have important health benefits, such as lowering blood pressure and promoting strong, healthy bones. However, the beneficial microbes (bacteria) present in yogurt during the fermentation process may be helpful with digestion, absorption and immunity. The root of sustaining a healthy body.  

Found in yogurt:
Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophiles, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei and Bifidus

Best uses: 


SNACK: 1/2 cup yogurt + fruit (or veggies)

BREAKFAST: 1 cup yogurt + 1/4 cup whole grain + 1/2 cup fruit 
sample: yogurt + oatmeal + banana 

LUNCH/DINNER: 2 TB yogurt + protein + grain/potato + vegetables 
sample: yogurt + lentils + sweet potato + greens 

 

Yogurt
This was noted during the Healthy Soil, Healthy Gut presentation at the Soil + Nutrition Conference.
Write a review
Print
Ingredients
  1. 1/2 cup yogurt
  2. 1 quart milk
  3. Mason Jar
  4. Sauce Pan
Instructions
  1. Place yogurt and milk into sauce pan to heat on low until temperature reaches 100 degrees. Pour into clean warm mason quart jar, cover and keep at 100 degrees for 8 - 30 hours. I prefer the 30 hours. You may use a Brod & Taylor (see below), an oven or a water bath.
Notes
  1. This would be considered raw, because of the 100 degrees used.
Adapted from John Bagnulo, MPH, PhD
Nutrition from the Ground Up https://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/

Milk: 

: milk from cows or goats that is used as food by people.

: a white liquid produced by a plant. (almond, hemp, oat, rice, coconut, cashew)


Top Milks to pick for homemade yogurt:
Raw Milk 
Goat Milk
Sheep’s Milk
Jersey Cow Milk

Why is raw better? 

The majority of dairy milks are heated to kill the existing bacteria, a process known as pasteurization. However, we may need that bacteria! There are also more Vitamin A, B vitamins, + enzyme phosphatase (needed for calcium absorption) in non-pasteurized milks. 

Whole Milk is best! – Vitamins A + K are fat-soluble (they need fat to be absorbed) 

Bifidobacterium Strains: (make sure to use a yogurt with these *) 

* B. Lactis – Immunity

*B. Bifidum – Immunity, GI Support 

B. Breve  – GI Support, Anti-aging (kimchi, sauerkraut + pickles)

B. Longum  – Constipation, Brain Function (we are born with)

*Lactobacillus acidophilus – Yeast control, breakdowns lactose

Lactobacillus plantarum – Controls inflammation + fortifies gut lining. (kimchi + sauerkraut)

alternative yogurt

Kefir can be defined as a tart drink made from a cow’s milk fermented with certain bacteria. The main difference between yogurt and kefir in terms of production is that kefir cultures at room temperature, whereas yogurt is started at room temperature, and is then cultured in an appliance that maintains around 100-110 degrees fahrenheit. The most significant benefit of kefir is the fact that it contains 10 times the amount of probiotics as regular yogurt. 

Suggested Study Reading:

Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry

Featured Recipes

Kimchi

December 16, 2016

Kimchi

Korean Cookery. a spicy fermented mixture containing cabbage, onions, and sometimes fish, variously seasons, as with garlic, horseradish, red peppers, and ginger.

Why add it to your meals? 

Kimchi is full of beneficial microbes for your gut health. Microbes help us digest and clear out toxins (boosting immunity). There are some studies that also show when eating meat with kimchi, less inflammatory markers are present. Most Americans don’t have all of the microbes we should in our GI tract, therefore adding 2 T of Kimchi to your meal will help you digest your food and send lots of lactobacilli bacteria (GOOD) to your inner eco-system. 

GUT HEALTH = physical, mental, and emotional well-being

Kimchi is high in Vitamin C + A. It can also produce amino acids, absorb minerals, and eliminate toxins. So what are we waiting for? 

There are over 300 different recipes for Kimchi and not any two taste exactly the same due to the fermentation process. You can intuitively make one your own with different herbs, seasonal vegetables and spices.

The two ingredients I chose to start with are Cabbage + Daikon Radish. 

Napa Cabbage: 

  • Vitamin K,  C & B6
  • Potassium, phosphorus, Calcium & magnesium

Daikon Radish: 

  • Vitamins A, C, E & B-6
  • Potassium, Magnesium, Calcium & Iron

Add your own: 
ginger
scallions
garlic 
onions
shallots
Coriander Seeds 


img_6406

Start slicing your cabbage and any other vegetables you choose. I recommend going to the farmers’ market to scope out what’s available. 

img_6410

You’ll need a bigger pot to massage all of your ingredients. Sprinkle a good quality sea salt (without anti-caking agents)  + organic red pepper flakes over your ingredients and let sit for a couple minutes.

Kimchi

You’ll notice that your cabbage will start sweating. It’s time! Connect your hands to your ingredients and start massaging for at least 5 minutes. 

Kimchi

The juices will build up and when you intuitively feel it is enough, pour everything into mason jars, a large glass jar or a fermenting crock. Make sure liquid is covering the ingredients. 

Kimchi

“To ferment your own food is to lodge a small but eloquent protest – on behalf of the senses and the microbes – against the homogenization of flavors and food experiences now rolling like a great, undifferentiated lawn across the globe. It is also a declaration of independence from an economy that would much prefer we remain passive consumers of its standardized commodities, rather than creators of idiosyncratic products expressive of ourselves and of the places where we live, because your pale ale or sourdough bread or kimchi is going to taste nothing like mine or anyone else’s.”
Michael Pollan, Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation

kimchi

When you are ready to cover, you can place a larger cabbage leaf on the top to help keep fluids covering ingredients. With your hands, push ingredients down into the jar to release as much oxygen as possible.  You may need a weight to hold the ingredients down.  Leave for 3 – 5 days, burping each day (opening the jar) or until taste is desired. 

with love

 

 

Featured Recipes

Vegetable Meatballs

December 16, 2016
meat·ball
 
a ball of ground or chopped protein with added seasonings. 
 

This past Fall, I got married to Shawn Vecchione and was honored to enjoy some of his family’s famous Italian recipes the night of our rehearsal dinner. See, this was quite a big deal! The Vecchione Family ran an Italian restaurant, Villa Vecchione, at the corner of Main Street and Potter Avenue in Hyannis, MA until 1992. This is the same location I now own The Local Juice with my partner, Jen Villa. One of their “secret recipes” was also enjoyed that evening….THE FAMOUS VEGETARIAN MEATBALLS. I haven’t received the recipe yet, but I was totally inspired to intuitively make my own for this season. 

Vegetable Meatballs

 

Vegetable Meatballs
Write a review
Print
Ingredients
  1. 4 cups oats
  2. ½ cup oregano
  3. 6 dates
  4. 2 cups almonds
  5. 1 cup nutritional yeast
  6. 1 tsp Sea Salt
  7. ½ tsp pepper
  8. 3/4 bunch kale
  9. 6 carrots
  10. ½ cup chia seeds
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Blend all ingredients in food processor. Roll into small balls and place on baking sheet coated with olive oil. Bake for 10 minutes. Serve with tomato sauce, 1 cup veggies + spaghetti squash OR as an appetizer with sauce on the side for dipping.
Notes
  1. Makes about 30 vegetables meatballs.
Nutrition from the Ground Up https://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/
 What is Nutritional Yeast? 

Simple, yet complex. It is an inactive yeast made from sugarcane and beet molasses from a fermentation process. Just like other fermented foods, it has benefits like antiviral, antibacterial and immune boosting. The nutrient package is pretty impressive: B vitamins, 9 grams of protein per 1/4 cup, folate, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, selenium and zinc. The nutty cheesy flavor makes it a great addition to lots of vegan dishes or in place of other processed condiments. NOTE: Be sure your nutritional yeast is labeled Non-GMO. 

Villa Vecchione

Featured Lifestyle Recipes

Fermenting Winter Squash

December 2, 2016

wild:

living or growing in the natural environment.

fla·vor:

enhance the taste of (food or drink) by adding a particular ingredient.

The book of the month is WILD FLAVORS, one chef’s transformative year cooking from Eva’s Farm. I purchased this book directly from Eva’s Gardens in Westport, MA on my own exploration of building relationships with as many farmers as I could in order to get closer to my food sources. It’s wonderful to see more chefs and farmers working on so many rich projects. We recently used this book in a nutrition from the ground up workshop to demonstrate how to ferment one of my favorite types of squash:

 delicata.

A squash with delicate skin, easy to cut and full of fiber, potassium, vitamin B, C and magnesium. It belongs to the summer squash family, however is consumed the same time of year as winter squash. Delicata squash can be baked, sautéed, steamed, grilled, but in this post we will share a unique way to enjoy this squash throughout the season, fermentation. 

Order your own copy of the book  + Follow Wild Flavors on Facebook

 

screenshot-2016-11-26-15-18-23

Meet Briget Bride, a psychotherapist who has a passion for preserving locally harvested treasures from farmers and foraging far and wide. She finds ingredients that are in season to bring into her kitchen to play with, making intuitive sauces, jams, syrups and healthy additions. I am so grateful to have her come to The Local Juice for monthly workshops. 

screenshot-2016-11-26-15-19-04

Briget has a private practice in the metro south of Boston, since 1993. through her own work she has cemented the belief that the mind and body are one organism that cannot be separated. This naturally includes food, where our food comes from and who grows it. This has fueled her passion for living a healthier more compassionate life by being more connected with nature, people, and how we nourish ourselves. Listen to the workshop or scroll down for easy instructions. 

screenshot-2016-11-26-15-18-36

Fermented Delicata Squash
Write a review
Print
Ingredients
  1. 12 whole allspice
  2. 3 cinnamon sticks
  3. 1 TB whole cloves
  4. 1/2 nutmeg
  5. 4 onions
  6. 4 pounds delicata squash
  7. 8 TB sea salt
  8. 2 Gallon of water
Instructions
  1. Prepare pumpkin-pie spice mix. Combine allspice, cinnamon sticks, whole cloves and nutmeg. Make the brine: 2 gallon of water, 8 TB sea salt + pumpkin-pie spice.
  2. Sterilize the jars, bands, lids and rocks (see below)
  3. Cool brine to room temperature.
  4. Slice squash in half and remove the seeds.
  5. Thinly slice onions and squash.
  6. Fill jars with layers on onions and squash.
  7. Press down to compress the vegetables and eliminate any spaces between them.
  8. Stop filling jars when there is 2-3 inches from the top.
  9. Pour brine to cover vegetables.
  10. Place rock on top of vegetables an push down.
  11. Screw the lids on the jars.
  12. Let sit at room temperature for 3 days, then move to refrigerator.
Notes
  1. You will have brine leftover, so plan to ferment other winter vegetables.
Adapted from Wild Flavors
Adapted from Wild Flavors
Nutrition from the Ground Up https://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/
screenshot-2016-11-26-15-18-49

NOTE: You’ll notice there will be a different texture when you slice the delicata squash thin versus slightly thicker. Both are amazing, so experiment to find your favorite. 

img_5050

sterilize the jars.

Wash jars with soap and thoroughly rinse them thoroughly or run them through the dishwasher (with no other items in it but the jars). Place them on a clean cookie sheet/roasting pan, right side up. Then, transfer them to the oven that has been preheated to 230 F where they must be for 20 minutes for sterilization. Cleaning is the first step, sterilization is the second. Remove when time is done and let cool. Cover with plastic wrap if not using right away.

img_5051

Making the brine.

We used 8 tablespoons of sea salt + pumpkin-pie spice with 2 gallons of water.


screenshot-2016-11-26-15-19-22

Packing your jars:

Simply layer onions and squash, but remember to leave 2 – 3 inches from the top. 

screenshot-2016-11-26-15-19-11

Rocks

Scrub rocks with a brush. Boil rocks for 20 minutes. Put vinegar in the water. Do not use lime stone. Granite is best. Don’t forget to remove rocks from the jars when the flavor you want is achieved. 

screenshot-2016-11-26-15-19-30

NOTE: Press rocks firmly into jars to pack vegetables. Leave the rocks in the jars, place lids on jars and let sit for 3 days at room temperature. Then, move into the refrigerator. 

screenshot-2016-11-26-15-19-39
More resources: 

Cultures For Health – Lacto-fermenting Squash, Pumpkin + other Winter Vegetables

with love