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Featured Lifestyle Recipes

Sea Beans

September 27, 2017

 

Forage

to search about; seek; rummage; hunt

Sea beans are an unusual vegetable that goes by many names such as salicornia, samphire and sea asparagus. It is primarily found growing near the ocean and around other salty bodies of water. Sea beans have been gaining in popularity in recent years for their salty taste and crunchy texture. Although it goes by the name of bean, this plant isn’t a bean at all, and is actually an edible succulent. While you may be able to find this unique green vegetable at your local farmer’s market it is commonly foraged by the sea. 

You will find it growing in the sand without any leaves or flowers, it looks like a mix of asparagus and green beans branching off in all directions.

Sea beans contain healthy amounts of vitamin A, calcium, iron, and iodine. Iodine is especially important for the function of your thyroid and is not abundant in many foods, making sea beans a worthy addition to your diet. The color of sea beans comes from the flavonoid known as quercetin. This flavonoid works as an antioxidant in your body preventing damage from free radicals and even reducing inflammation. This distinctive vegetable is also high in protein providing 10 grams in just a half cup of the raw stalks.

The natural saltiness that this succulent provides lends well to the process of pickling. Pickling sea beans is simple and will result in a great addition to a grain bowl or salad.


Pickled Sea beans
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Ingredients
  1. sea beans
  2. 1-liter apple cider vinegar
  3. 500-mL water
  4. 2/3 cup honey
  5. 1 teaspoon black mustard seed
  6. 4 teaspoons coriander seed
  7. 3 teaspoons fennel seed
For the Brine
  1. In a medium saucepan, roast the spices on medium heat until they are fragrant. Add this to the vinegar, water, and honey and bring to a boil.
For the Beans
  1. Placed washed beans in a mason jar to fill 3/4 of the way and fill remainder of jar with brine. Put a lid on the jar and store in the fridge for
Notes
  1. The remaining brine can be used to pickle any other vegetables on hand or saved in the refrigerator
Nutrition from the Ground Up https://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/


This chart shows a few grain bowl options that you can combine your pickled sea beans with for added nutrition and flavor! To use the chart simply pick an ingredient from each category and add any spices or seasonings you would like to create a complete meal. 


Meet one of our interns:

Taylor is a dietetics student working towards her bachelor’s degree at Montclair State University in New Jersey. When she graduates she plans to attend a dietetic internship and hopes to work in nutrition counseling, helping clients to attain a healthy relationship with their food. She enjoys testing out new plant based recipes in her free time as well as being active through activities like hiking and yoga.

Featured Recipes

Mix N Match Jars

December 20, 2015

The initial thought of preparing meals ahead may seem boring, repetitive and bland.  However, cooking in batches doesn’t have to be repetitious or any of those! Let’s make some amazingly delicious and absolutely gorgeous jars together that will get you excited every time you open your refrigerator. Think of it as creating your very own “grab ‘n go”. 

Mix N Match Bowls

FIRST = Take a peek at your pantry practice 

{NOTE}    Do you have your whole grains where you can see them? List them. 

{NOTE}    What do you have for protein options? List them. 

{NOTE}    Make a list of all fresh and frozen vegetables available. 


 

SECOND =  Choose TWO different grains to incorporate (the purpose is FIBER) 

{NOTE}    These are Gluten-free: 

  • red or white quinoa
  • brown or wild rice
  • buckwheat (Kasha)
  • millet
  • amaranth 

{NOTE}    You may also use these whole grains: 

  • wheat berries
  • farro
  • kamut
  • spelt
  • barley

{NOTE}    1 cup of dry grain + 2 cups of water = 4 servings

Rice Cooker Directions: Place grain + water in cooker and PRESS THE BUTTON. Don’t forget to check on it to make sure it doesn’t burn. Most grains will be done between 10 – 40 minutes. 

{NOTE}    Add 1 TB Olive Oil or Coconut Oil (It will help you absorb Vitamins A, D, E and K)

Stove Directions: Place grain + water in a small pot, bring water to a boil, then turn down to simmer until water is absorbed and grain is tender. Each grain requires a slightly different cooking time. 

Now the grain will be ready to add 1/2 cup COOKED grain to Vegetables + Protein! 


 THIRD = Cook your Vegetables anyway you choose

  • Saute 
  • Roast
  • Steam 
  • Grill 
  • Leave fresh + crisp 

{NOTE}    Add 1 TB Olive Oil or Coconut Oil (It will help you absorb Vitamins A, D, E and K)

{NOTE}    Choose seasonal vegetables when possible 

{NOTE}    Always add dark leafy greens 


FOURTH = Choose your protein options {more plants}

  • 1/2 cup cooked Chickpeas, Black Beans, Pinto, Lentils
  • Fish {6 ounces} – Haddock, Salmon, Monkfish, Mackerel, Tuna, Squid 
  • Shellfish {6 ounces} – shrimp, oysters, mussels, clams, scallops
  • Pasture-Raised Chicken or Poultry {4 ounces}
  • Grass-fed Beef or Bison {3 ounces}
  • Venison or Duck {3 ounces}

{NOTE}    We are NOT counting calories!

A calorie is NOT a calorie. In order to feel your best this season, try identifying whether your food choices are a {protein} or {fiber}. This will automatically give your food a purpose. If your choices aren’t proteins or fibers, they are most likely empty calorie options that aren’t supplying your body with nutrition. In this case, you won’t end up satisfied and your body will be looking for more. Look at the example below and see what can happen when you don’t plan ahead and wind up eating impulsively with empty calories.

Let’s take a look at some of my intuitive assembles

Tempeh + Buttercup Squash + Spinach + Eggplant + Spelt Berries

Tempeh Grain Bowl

 Tofu + Butternut Squash + Mushrooms + Spinach + Cabbage + Farro

Tofu and Vegetable Bowl

Shrimp + Broccoli + Kale + Wheat Berries 

Shrimp and Broccoli Bowl

Almonds + Mango + Blackberries + Millet 

Breakfast Bowl Ingredients

This can open up a whole new way of thinking about your breakfast. The challenge is time. We simply don’t have enough, or do we!?  Another challenge is getting the foods we need in the correct combination to manage our blood sugars, energy levels and hunger though out the day, meaning we really need to focus on getting protein AND fiber every time we eat, especially at breakfast.

For example, some of us may just have a bagel or muffin for breakfast, which will spike your blood sugars. This results in low energy levels and more cravings for the rest of the day. It is the protein and fiber combination that really fuels your body the best. So, let’s practice with breakfast to set the tone for the day.

Breakfast fuel should include a Protein + Whole Grain + Fruit

{NOTE}    If you incorporate potatoes into your breakfast, you may choose to skip the grain. For example, Egg + Sweet Potato + Kale 

Breakfast Bowl

Featured Lifestyle

10 Things to Consider for your Nutrition Practice

December 31, 2016

Practice:

: to do (something) regularly or constantly as an ordinary part of your life

: the activity of doing something again and again in order to become better at it

Nutrition:

:  the act or process of nourishing or being nourished

Going forward one year, I thought I would share my own personal practice + re-rooting activities. 

A few basics: 

1. Morning Routine

Take two minutes of stillness. Journal one page.  Eat breakfast every day with protein, whole grain OR potato & fruit or vegetables. This killer combo sets the tone for managing your blood sugars, energy level and hunger throughout the day. Below is Oatmeal + Sunflower Butter + Mint + Ginger + Cinnamon + Banana. 

2. Hydrate

Drink more than 8 cups of water per day to help your body efficiently flush toxins and better absorb nutrients. Start with apple cider vinegar, lemon & spice H20. Make lots of tea. Rosemary + Ginger + Honey + Turmeric + Apple Cider Vinegar + Garlic + Lime. 


3. Add Greens + Fiber

Eat more than 5 FULL cups of vegetables and fruits a day. Emphasize veggies! During the winter months roasting seasonal vegetables are an easy and flavorful option. Also, adding greens to any recipe –  salad, soup, chili or stew.


4. Meal Meditations

During your meal preparation +/or meal time, try a meal meditation: 

Connect with each ingredient in your meal. Observe it in its whole form, feel it, smell it, taste it and most importantly, connect to it. Read how to create your own meal bowls.

Silent Meal Meditation Classes begin in March + April at The Local Juice12 – 1 PM WEDNESDAYS. Please contact for more information.


5. Snacking 

Eat a balanced snack. Always pair protein and fiber – and try to eat what’s in season. For example, a pear with a handful of almonds, apple slices with natural peanut or almond butter, or raw yogurt with pomegranates. Use the chart below to assemble your own combos. 

Protein Fiber
Nuts (1/4 c) Apple
Seeds (1/4 c) Persimmon
Nut Butter (1 – 2 TB) Pomagranate
Energy Burst  Carrots
Yogurt (1/2 – 1 c) Cauliflower
Lentils (1/2 c) Green Beans
Beans (1/2 c) Celery
Chickpeas (1/2 c) Any Fruit
Smoothie (Protein + Fruit + Greens) Any Vegetable
Raw Milk Cheese (1 oz) Whole Grain Crackers

To open your pomagranate:

Place under water, then break open to release the seeds from the membrane. 


6. Make an appointment for a Kitchen Therapy session once per week: 

Have a sit still & rejuvenate day at home.  Kitchen therapy:  Prepare what I need for a supportive week. 1) make a batch of grains {polenta, spelt berries, wild rice} 2) cook vegetables 3) make greens readily available 4) prepare proteins 5) make tea 


7. Expand your relationships.

It will be my First New Year Married – Love, relate & meditate 2017. Excited to learn more about meditation in the next year. Spending time with my new family, exploring more functional nutrition & health, sharing our landing space & expanding our sustainable living. 


8. Travel – Inspirational trips

My first personal inspirational trip will be to India – {Stay tuned for the travel posts about farming, culinary & daily lessons}

Be in love with your life. Every minute of it. – Jack Kerouac

9. Shop more consciously. Below are the links to where my above travel items stemmed from. 

Devinto Design Leggings & Underwear 

Wellfleet Clothing Swap 

Dumptique Martha’s Vineyard

Homegrown Trades 

Shift 

Wind-born Journal

Artichoke Bathing Suit (+ socks)


10. Join our NFTGU Community – HUGE NEWS!!!! 

The first issue of Nutrition from the Ground Up guide is coming! 

Get the basics of structuring a nutrition practice, from nutritional building blocks to pantry design. nutritionally complete recipe suggestions with substitution ideas to encourage your intuitive cooking practice to grow – including smart snacks and quick meals. My seasonal produce picks will inspire you to use what’s fresh now. There will be mindful moments that recognize and strengthen the mind / body connection between you, your nutrition practice, and your overall well-being.

Featured Lifestyle

Cultivating a Positive Body Image

August 26, 2016

Body image is defined as “The subjective picture or mental image of one’s own body.” It encompasses one’s own ideas, memories, generalizations, beliefs and feelings surrounding their body. In essence, it’s how you feel in and about your body.

  • A negative body image includes a distorted perception of one’s own shape, feeling uncomfortable in your own body or feeling self-conscious or anxious about your body’s appearance. It also includes negative perceptions like the thin ideal;  the idea that an individual is only attractive when they obtain a certain body size. 
  • A positive body image could be described as a clear and genuine perception of your body’s shape, but it’s also more than that. It’s feeling confident and empowered in your skin, no matter its shape, blemishes, or past. It’s feeling free from the restraints of the thin ideal. You appreciate and celebrate your body for everything it does for you and place little emphasis on physical appearance, whether it be your own or others.

Body image affects everyone; male, female, young and old. In recent years, the media has waged a war on our individual body image. Research has increasingly demonstrated the media’s link to the thin ideal, and it’s seeping deeper into our society, affecting us more and more. According to the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA):

  • 98% of american women are not as thin as fashion models
  • 42% of 1st-3rd graders want to be thinner
  • 81% of 10 year olds are afraid of being fat
  • 70% of 18-30 year olds don’t like their body
  • 60% of those in middle age remain unsatisfied
  • 50% of girls use unhealthy weight control methods such as skipping meals, fasting, smoking, vomiting, or laxative use.
  • 25% of pathological dieters progress to a full blown eating disorder. 

Letting go of the oppressive diet culture:

Diets hold us back on our journey to body positivity as they encourage a restriction mentality and hold food as a token object, one that can be taken away as a form of punishment. Food should never be looked at in this way. We should look towards each meal as a form of nourishment and act of self love. When we eat well and balanced, it is a form of self respect. When we use food as an object of control and degrade our bodies natural urges, that is when we begin to mistreat ourselves and fall into negative and oppressive patterns.

How does our body image affect our nutrition practice?

Our body image affects us in a multitude of ways; socially, emotionally, mentally and behaviorally. People with negative body images are more likely to develop an obsession with weight loss and will go to extremes to obtain their ideal body image. This can be in the form of food restriction, extreme dieting, exercising, etc. All of which can affect our nutrition practice and lead to an imbalance. When we eat and think only in terms of weight loss, we lose the connection between food and health. When we begin to manipulate food in unhealthy ways we look less for nutrients and more for low numbers. Low fat/sugar/calories does not mean it’s healthy and limiting calories does not ensure weight loss. When we think in these definitive ways we give into diet culture and fall out of balance with ourselves.

With a positive body image, one is able to truly cultivate a nutrition practice; one that is based on balance and nurturing each and every cell in your body. Emphasis is on natural and whole foods that will keep your body running smoothly from the inside out, not on low nutrition facts. Positive body image helps one accept what our bodies need to run properly and nourish it completely. Hunger is seen as a sign of self respect, not weakness. Body positive individuals listen to their bodies, understand what they need and accept themselves as they are. Giving up diets and prior idealizations, we are able to truly realize body love.

How to cultivate a positive body image:


We talk about cultivating a nutrition practice, but what about a self-love practice?

Begin with examining your own thoughts, beliefs, attitudes and prejudices about your own body, weight and eating patterns. Can you replace any negative thoughts with positive ones in your own daily life? Here are a few ideas to practice:

  • Practice mindfulness throughout the day, especially during meals and exercising. Eat mindfully, slowly, and in a calm quiet area. Pay attention to your food, thoughts, and nourishing yourself.
  • Think critically about what you see in the media and online. We are bombarded by so much information and images on a daily basis, it’s hard to take the time to examine what’s true and what’s false. 
  • Practice acts of self-love daily. From writing daily affirmations to practicing meditation to yoga and journaling. Find something you love to do and practice it daily.
  • Surround yourself with positive people that lift you up and encourage you to be your best possible self.
  • Wear clothes that represent your true authentic self. Find things that make you feel comfortable and happy.
  • Look at yourself holistically, you may be a work in progress, but that doesn’t mean you can’t love yourself along the way. 

Meal Meditations: 

Before your meal, try a sequence of Sun Salutations: 

Sun salutations are great to do before meals. Thank the sun, the earth, the soil, visualize your garden, a farm, the farmer, the plants growing, rain falling, seeds coming out of the ground + the energy that’s in your food. A lot of hard work has gone into your meal.


Right before your meal, try the Zen Meal Chant: 

First, let us reflect on our own work and the effort of those who brought us this food.
Second, let us be aware of the quality of our deeds as we receive this meal.
Third, what is most essential is the practice of mindfulness, which helps us to transcend greed, anger and delusion.
Fourth, we appreciate this food which sustains the good health of our body and mind.
Fifth, in order to continue our practice for all beings we accept this offering.

meal meditation


During your meal preparation +/or meal time, try a meal meditation: 

Connect with each ingredient in your meal. Observe it in its whole form, feel it, smell it, taste it and most importantly, connect to it. Read how to create your own meal bowls.

meal meditation 2


Books 

How to Eat by Thich Nhat Hanh

Mindful Eating by Rachel Bartholomew + Mandy Pearson

Light on Life by B.K.S. Iyengar


Mindful Moment with Dr. Mary: 

“Allowing for intuitive cooking means being Open, Relaxed, and connecting with the Creative part of yourself.

Open comes when we operate from a ‘judgment-free zone.’ Acceptance of others, of possibilities, of combinations, and of course — of ourselves.

Relaxation comes when one engages in self-care. More than adequate sleep, good nutrition, plenty of water, regular soaks, meditation, progressive relaxation, and exercise.

Creativity comes when you engage in self-acceptance and allow for things to flow.”

~ Mary Acunzo, Ph.D {we’ll be hearing more from Mary in the future!}

 

A special thank you to Olivia Eldridge, a Delicious Living Nutrition intern, for working on this post with me. Olivia is studying Psychology at Emmanuel College in Boston, MA with a strong interest in Eating Disorders and Nutrition. 

liv

 

 

 

 

 

with love

 

 

 

 

 

Featured Recipes

Sprouts

May 26, 2016

Sprouts are the first shoots of a plant and are tender, delicate, tasty, and highly nutritious.  They are new life awakening.  Once sprouted, our bodies can better absorb essential nutrients like iron, calcium, amino acids, B vitamins, and vitamin C.  When plants are sprouted they are also easier to digest, in their simple sugar and amino acid form.  Sprouts are delicious any time of the year but make for a great source of nutrients and freshness during the early Spring months.  Early Spring gardening is about hardy greens and delicate sprouts, providing the bare essential nutrients needed for keeping our bodies ad minds healthy when fresh food, sunlight, and movement are in shorter supply.

sprouts

You can purchase sprouted grains at various food stores but you can just as easily do it yourself!  It’s an easy process, offers you fresh and healthy food, and can be a fun project to try.  Sprouts are so good because the biochemical changes that occur during the sprouting process allow them to be more digestible and increase their vitamin content.  For example, the sprouted mung bean has the simple carbohydrate content of a melon, the vitamin A of a lemon, the thiamin of an avocado, and the list goes on.

sprouts

You can sprout many things! Try grains, seeds, or beans.  For grains, first, find the whole grain you’d like to try sprouting.  You can choose any that still has the germ and bran and has not been altered yet.  For example, amaranth, barley, buckwheat, corn, einkorn, farro, kumut, millet, quinoa, rice, rye berry, sorghum, spelt, or wheatberry all will do the trick.  Try these simple steps:

What to gather: 

1-quart mason jar
Cheese cloth or screen (to allow water and air through)
Metal band or rubber band to secure cover
½ cup of grain
Water

1. Rinse and drain the grains
2. Place the grains in a bowl of water, covered a couple of inches, and soak overnight to release enzyme inhibitors
3. Drain the grains and rinse again with cool water
4. Place the grains in the jar and cover
5. Turn the jar upside down and angled  so that air can circulate in and water can drain out
6. Every 12 hours or so rinse the grains with water, drain, and return to the upside-down position
7. Continue step 6 until your grains have sprouted, rinse again, store in the refrigerator, and enjoy!

You can also try sprouting seeds and beans with a similar process! To calculate your bean-to-sprout ratio follow these simple guidelines:

1 lb of small seeds = 20 liters
1/4 cup of beans = 1 liter

TIP: Use 1 TB of seeds OR 1/8 cup of beans to make 2 cups of sprouts

Lentils

Now, you can sprout pretty much anything- try one of the following: alfalfa, broccoli, sunflower, radish, lentils, mung beans, peas, arugula, beets, adukzi beans, clover, mustard, garlic chive, garbanzo, cabbage, quinoa, pumpkin, hemp, chia, garlic, or leeks.

1. Fill a mason jar or bowl with cool water and soak your beans or seeds for 4-12 hours, covered with a cloth
2.Rise and drain with cool water, cover with a cloth, set in a dark place for 2-5 days, rinsing and draining every 12 hours
3. After 3-5 day when sprouts are desired height, set in the sunlight for a day to increase the chlorophyll content
4. Harvest when sprouts are 1-2 inches long with delicate green leave; enjoy within 4 days 

Any of these sprouts can be added to salads, soups, stir-fry’s for a yummy taste, texture, and health boost.  Think outside the box and try your newly sprouted grains at all meals of the day, even dessert! You can also bake with them, dry them, or make them into flour.

Beans

FOOD SOAKING TIME  SPROUTING TIME (days)
Almonds 8-12 No Sprouting (if pasteurized) 3 Days (raw)
Adzuki Beans 8-12 4
Amaranth 8 2-3
Barley 6 2
Black Beans 8-12 3
Brazil Nuts 3 No Sprouting
Buckwheat 6 2-3
Cashews 2-4 No Sprouting
Garbanzo 8 3-4 
Flaxseeds ½ No Sprouting
Hazelnuts 8-12 No Sprouting
Kamut 7 2-3
Lentils 7 2-3
Macadamias 2 No Sprouting
Millet 5 1
Mung Beans 8-12 4
Oat Groats 6 2-3
Pecans 6 No Sprouting
Pistachios 8 No Sprouting
Pumpkin Seeds 8 3
Radish Seeds 8-12 3-4
Sesame Seeds 8 2-3
Sunflower Seeds 8 1
Quinoa 4 2-3
Walnuts 4 No Sprouting
Wheat Berries 7 3-4
Wild Rice 9 3-5

Try out some of these recipes, great ways to enjoy these gorgeous little sprouts!  

Shiitake Lettuce Cups
You may intuitively create your own lettuce cups. Bring together a protein with your choice of seasonal vegetables. You may also like to add 1/2 cup of cooked grain to each serving.
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Ingredients
  1. 1 cup Shiitake mushrooms, sliced
  2. 1 TB Srirachi sauce
  3. 2 TB Unfiltered Apple Cider Vinegar
  4. 2 TB Bragg's Aminos
  5. 2 TB Dijon mustard
  6. 1 block Tempeh, crumbled
  7. 1 cup Broccoli Sprouts
  8. 1 TB Coconut Oil
  9. 1/2 cup Shredded Carrots
  10. 1/2 cup Onions, sliced
  11. 1 TB Sesame Oil
  12. 1 head Boston Lettuce
  13. 2 cloves garlic, chopped
Instructions
  1. In a large frying pan, heat palm oil and sauté tempeh, mushrooms, onions, srirachi sauce & garlic. Cook for 10 minutes, covered. In a mason jar or small bowl, mix dressing using tamari, mustard, vinegar & sesame oil. Place tempeh mixture into each lettuce cup, then drizzle dressing and top with carrots & broccoli sprouts. To finish, drizzle more srirachi sauce. Serves two for dinner or four for an appetizer.
Nutrition from the Ground Up https://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/
Fresh Shrimp Vegetable Spring Rolls
You can also intuitively design your own spring rolls with a different protein and vegetables with what you have in your kitchen.
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Ingredients
  1. 8 spring roll rice papers
  2. 16 shrimp, sautéed in red palm oil
  3. 1 cup pea greens or any greens
  4. 1 cup chinese rose radish sprouts or any sprouts
  5. 1 cup carrots, shredded
  6. 1/2 cup mushrooms, sliced
  7. 1 cup asparagus, chopped
  8. 1/2 cup water chestnuts, sliced
  9. 12 fresh mint leaves
Instructions
  1. Fill a large mixing bowl with warm water, then submerge one paper into water until it feels extremely flexible. Remove from water and let drip over bowl, then place onto cutting board. Lay mint leaves in a row horizontally across. Top with all other ingredients, accept shrimp. Lay shrimp in a row horizontally across. Pull inwards both sides, then lift side closest to you, folding it over in the opposite direction until it creates a roll shown in picture.
Nutrition from the Ground Up https://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/

 Or just a simple Sprouted Sandwich:

1 cup of sprouts
1 TB Avocado
2 TB hummus
1 fried or poached egg
2 slices of homemade Sourdough or a Sprouted Grain Bread

with love

Featured Lifestyle Recipes

Sourdough

May 7, 2016

A little history about my own digestive issues…I was diagnosed with Irritable Bowl Syndrome since I was 8 years-old. Stomach aches, bloating, distention and long sessions in the bathroom all by myself. As I became Registered Dietitian and created my own nutrition practice, I was able to manage my IBS symptoms through balancing what I chose to eat. As many of you know, I love to cook intuitively with vegetables, fruits, grains and proteins. However, when it comes to baking, well, it’s never been my strong suit. Partly, because I was afraid of feeling sick. I’ve now learned how to incorporate sourdough into my nutrition practice and I’m loving it! 

I’d like to dedicate this post to my friend Tara Laidlaw on Camp Burgess Farm, who was generous in providing me with her family’s fifth generation sourdough starter from San Fransisco, California. Recently, I also received another sourdough starter from my friend, Becky Nadeau (my wedding planner) from Berkshire Mountain Bakery.  They are featured in my new favorite documentary series, Cooked

 


A little bit more about sourdough:

Sourdough is not your typical bread product compared to most. It is made by a long fermentation of dough often derived from generations ago and is the traditional preparation of grains. However, you can create your own sourdough starter using flour and water. The fermentation process uses natural occurring lactobaccilli and yeast. Like many traditions, there are several methods to follow. 

Why do people become attached to their sourdough starters? I had the opportunity to receive a San Fransisco Sourdough starter from a friend, Tara Laidlaw. This starter has been in her family for generations. I automatically felt a level of responsibility. After researching how to care for my starter, I realized, like many do, this “thing” deserves a name. After all, its going to be hanging out in my kitchen, I’m going to be feeding it and it’s going to allow me to bake with it. This was the beginning of a new relationship with “Walter” or “Wally”.  We named our new starter from Berkshire Mountain Bakery, “Susie.” 

Some common practices for serving your starter refreshments or feedings is to use Unbleached, Unbromated Flour and Unchlorinated Water, pay attention to Temperature. To learn more, visit www.CulturesforHealth.com.

Sourdough is a stable culture of lactic acid bacteria and yeast in flour and water with a few health benefits and a mild sour taste.

Potential benefits of sourdough:

  • Easier to digest
  • Lactic acid creates an ideal pH to decrease phytates, which can block the uptake of critical minerals like calcium, magnesium, copper and zinc.
  • Increased amounts of zinc, iron, magnesium, copper and phosphorus
  • Breakdown of gluten and predigestion of starches
  • The acetic acid which is produced along with lactic acid, helps preserve the bread by inhibiting the growth of mold


sourdough2

Ingredients:

Leaven:
1/4 cup Sourdough Starter
1/2 cup Flour
1/3 cup Water

sourdough 4

Dough:
2 1/2 cup spring water
5 1/2 cups Whole Spelt Flour
1 1/2 tsp Sea Salt

sourdough 3

In a mixing bowl, fluff whole spelt flour. Add 1 tsp of Sea Salt to flour and mix. Pour flour and salt mixture into the sourdough, add water and mix until you end up with your sourdough ball.
Place into a bowl and cover for up to 4 hours. To fold, pick up the dough, stretch and then fold the dough. Stretch again in the opposite direction. Do this 4 times. Place back into bowl and cover for 1/2 hour. Complete this 6 times (2 1/2 hours). Let sit undisturbed for 1 hour.

sourdough 5
Gently, divide the dough into 2 balls using a small amount of flour. Let them rest for 30 minutes. Fold each of the loaves again. Place the loaves into bowls and cover, then allow it to sit 3-4 hours.
Preheat your oven to 500 degrees. Place an empty dutch oven with lid on for the last half hour. Pull the dutch oven out of the oven and gently transfer the dough from the colander. Put the lid back on and return to oven and bake for 20 minutes. Remove the lid and allow to bake for 10 additional minutes. Let cool before slicing.

sourdough 6
Don’t forget to save 1/4 cup of sourdough starter for your next batch. You can also save a few extra 1/4 cup sourdough starter jars for your friends!

Sourdough Spelt Bread
This is my simplified method of making sourdough, however to find more details visit: http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-make-sourdough-bread-224367.
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Leaven
  1. 1/4 cup Sourdough Starter
  2. 1/2 cup Flour
  3. 1/3 cup Water
Dough
  1. 2 1/2 cup spring water
  2. 5 1/2 cups Whole Spelt Flour
  3. 1 1/2 tsp Sea Salt
Instructions
  1. In a mixing bowl, fluff whole spelt flour. Add 1 tsp of Sea Salt to flour and mix. Pour flour and salt mixture into the sourdough, add water and mix until you end up with your sourdough ball.
  2. Place into a bowl and cover for up to 4 hours. To fold, pick up the dough, stretch and then fold the dough. Stretch again in the opposite direction. Do this 4 times. Place back into bowl and cover for 1/2 hour. Complete this 6 times (2 1/2 hours). Let sit undisturbed for 1 hour.
  3. Gently, divide the dough into 2 balls using a small amount of flour. Let them rest for 30 minutes. Fold each of the loaves again. Place the loaves into bowls and cover, then allow it to sit 3-4 hours.
  4. Preheat your oven to 500 degrees. Place an empty dutch oven with lid on for the last half hour. Pull the dutch oven out of the oven and gently transfer the dough from the colander. Put the lid back on and return to oven and bake for 20 minutes. Remove the lid and allow to bake for 10 additional minutes. Let cool before slicing.
  5. Don’t forget to save 1/4 cup of sourdough starter for your next batch. You can also save a few extra 1/4 cup sourdough starter jars for your friends!
Adapted from The Kitchn
Adapted from The Kitchn
Nutrition from the Ground Up https://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/
sourdough 7