Browsing Tag

grains

Featured Recipes

Teff

February 6, 2017

Teff 

Vitamin C (rare find in a grain)
Iron 
Calcium 
Potassium 
Protein (I recommend to still add one protein to this grain)

An annual grass (LOVEGRASS) crop harvested for grain in Ethiopia that has now become available to Westerners due to European cultivation. In the United States, we mostly grow it in Kansas + Idaho. Teff is the tiniest known grain in the world. It is also a naturally gluten-free grain. A favorite new addition to my breakfast repertoire!  

porridge

:  a soft food made by boiling meal of grains or legumes in milk or water until thick

Cranbery Molasses Teff Porridge
Serves two.
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Ingredients
  1. 1/2 cup teff
  2. 1 1/2 cup water
  3. 1 TB coconut oil
  4. 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  5. 1 cup fresh or frozen cranberries
  6. 1/4 cup nuts or seeds (optional for protein)
  7. 1/8 cup black strap molasses or apple cider molasses
  8. 1/4 cup almond milk
Instructions
  1. Place teff in a saucepan on medium heat stirring frequently for 5 minutes to toast. You'll hear the grains start crackling as they pop. Add water, coconut oil, cinnamon, cranberries + molasses, then stir. Lower heat to simmer for about 15 minutes until grains are soft and porridge consistency. Add milk and optional toppings: pepitas, almonds, pecans
Notes
  1. Please try to intuitively cook this recipe into your own. You can change the fruit, protein and sweetener (date, honey or maple syrup).
Nutrition from the Ground Up https://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/
Featured Recipes

Sprouts

May 26, 2016

Sprouts are the first shoots of a plant and are tender, delicate, tasty, and highly nutritious.  They are new life awakening.  Once sprouted, our bodies can better absorb essential nutrients like iron, calcium, amino acids, B vitamins, and vitamin C.  When plants are sprouted they are also easier to digest, in their simple sugar and amino acid form.  Sprouts are delicious any time of the year but make for a great source of nutrients and freshness during the early Spring months.  Early Spring gardening is about hardy greens and delicate sprouts, providing the bare essential nutrients needed for keeping our bodies ad minds healthy when fresh food, sunlight, and movement are in shorter supply.

sprouts

You can purchase sprouted grains at various food stores but you can just as easily do it yourself!  It’s an easy process, offers you fresh and healthy food, and can be a fun project to try.  Sprouts are so good because the biochemical changes that occur during the sprouting process allow them to be more digestible and increase their vitamin content.  For example, the sprouted mung bean has the simple carbohydrate content of a melon, the vitamin A of a lemon, the thiamin of an avocado, and the list goes on.

sprouts

You can sprout many things! Try grains, seeds, or beans.  For grains, first, find the whole grain you’d like to try sprouting.  You can choose any that still has the germ and bran and has not been altered yet.  For example, amaranth, barley, buckwheat, corn, einkorn, farro, kumut, millet, quinoa, rice, rye berry, sorghum, spelt, or wheatberry all will do the trick.  Try these simple steps:

What to gather: 

1-quart mason jar
Cheese cloth or screen (to allow water and air through)
Metal band or rubber band to secure cover
½ cup of grain
Water

1. Rinse and drain the grains
2. Place the grains in a bowl of water, covered a couple of inches, and soak overnight to release enzyme inhibitors
3. Drain the grains and rinse again with cool water
4. Place the grains in the jar and cover
5. Turn the jar upside down and angled  so that air can circulate in and water can drain out
6. Every 12 hours or so rinse the grains with water, drain, and return to the upside-down position
7. Continue step 6 until your grains have sprouted, rinse again, store in the refrigerator, and enjoy!

You can also try sprouting seeds and beans with a similar process! To calculate your bean-to-sprout ratio follow these simple guidelines:

1 lb of small seeds = 20 liters
1/4 cup of beans = 1 liter

TIP: Use 1 TB of seeds OR 1/8 cup of beans to make 2 cups of sprouts

Lentils

Now, you can sprout pretty much anything- try one of the following: alfalfa, broccoli, sunflower, radish, lentils, mung beans, peas, arugula, beets, adukzi beans, clover, mustard, garlic chive, garbanzo, cabbage, quinoa, pumpkin, hemp, chia, garlic, or leeks.

1. Fill a mason jar or bowl with cool water and soak your beans or seeds for 4-12 hours, covered with a cloth
2.Rise and drain with cool water, cover with a cloth, set in a dark place for 2-5 days, rinsing and draining every 12 hours
3. After 3-5 day when sprouts are desired height, set in the sunlight for a day to increase the chlorophyll content
4. Harvest when sprouts are 1-2 inches long with delicate green leave; enjoy within 4 days 

Any of these sprouts can be added to salads, soups, stir-fry’s for a yummy taste, texture, and health boost.  Think outside the box and try your newly sprouted grains at all meals of the day, even dessert! You can also bake with them, dry them, or make them into flour.

Beans

FOOD SOAKING TIME  SPROUTING TIME (days)
Almonds 8-12 No Sprouting (if pasteurized) 3 Days (raw)
Adzuki Beans 8-12 4
Amaranth 8 2-3
Barley 6 2
Black Beans 8-12 3
Brazil Nuts 3 No Sprouting
Buckwheat 6 2-3
Cashews 2-4 No Sprouting
Garbanzo 8 3-4 
Flaxseeds ½ No Sprouting
Hazelnuts 8-12 No Sprouting
Kamut 7 2-3
Lentils 7 2-3
Macadamias 2 No Sprouting
Millet 5 1
Mung Beans 8-12 4
Oat Groats 6 2-3
Pecans 6 No Sprouting
Pistachios 8 No Sprouting
Pumpkin Seeds 8 3
Radish Seeds 8-12 3-4
Sesame Seeds 8 2-3
Sunflower Seeds 8 1
Quinoa 4 2-3
Walnuts 4 No Sprouting
Wheat Berries 7 3-4
Wild Rice 9 3-5

Try out some of these recipes, great ways to enjoy these gorgeous little sprouts!  

Shiitake Lettuce Cups
You may intuitively create your own lettuce cups. Bring together a protein with your choice of seasonal vegetables. You may also like to add 1/2 cup of cooked grain to each serving.
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Ingredients
  1. 1 cup Shiitake mushrooms, sliced
  2. 1 TB Srirachi sauce
  3. 2 TB Unfiltered Apple Cider Vinegar
  4. 2 TB Bragg's Aminos
  5. 2 TB Dijon mustard
  6. 1 block Tempeh, crumbled
  7. 1 cup Broccoli Sprouts
  8. 1 TB Coconut Oil
  9. 1/2 cup Shredded Carrots
  10. 1/2 cup Onions, sliced
  11. 1 TB Sesame Oil
  12. 1 head Boston Lettuce
  13. 2 cloves garlic, chopped
Instructions
  1. In a large frying pan, heat palm oil and sauté tempeh, mushrooms, onions, srirachi sauce & garlic. Cook for 10 minutes, covered. In a mason jar or small bowl, mix dressing using tamari, mustard, vinegar & sesame oil. Place tempeh mixture into each lettuce cup, then drizzle dressing and top with carrots & broccoli sprouts. To finish, drizzle more srirachi sauce. Serves two for dinner or four for an appetizer.
Nutrition from the Ground Up https://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/
Fresh Shrimp Vegetable Spring Rolls
You can also intuitively design your own spring rolls with a different protein and vegetables with what you have in your kitchen.
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Ingredients
  1. 8 spring roll rice papers
  2. 16 shrimp, sautéed in red palm oil
  3. 1 cup pea greens or any greens
  4. 1 cup chinese rose radish sprouts or any sprouts
  5. 1 cup carrots, shredded
  6. 1/2 cup mushrooms, sliced
  7. 1 cup asparagus, chopped
  8. 1/2 cup water chestnuts, sliced
  9. 12 fresh mint leaves
Instructions
  1. Fill a large mixing bowl with warm water, then submerge one paper into water until it feels extremely flexible. Remove from water and let drip over bowl, then place onto cutting board. Lay mint leaves in a row horizontally across. Top with all other ingredients, accept shrimp. Lay shrimp in a row horizontally across. Pull inwards both sides, then lift side closest to you, folding it over in the opposite direction until it creates a roll shown in picture.
Nutrition from the Ground Up https://nutritionfromthegroundup.com/

 Or just a simple Sprouted Sandwich:

1 cup of sprouts
1 TB Avocado
2 TB hummus
1 fried or poached egg
2 slices of homemade Sourdough or a Sprouted Grain Bread

with love

Featured Recipes

Mix N Match Jars

December 20, 2015

The initial thought of preparing meals ahead may seem boring, repetitive and bland.  However, cooking in batches doesn’t have to be repetitious or any of those! Let’s make some amazingly delicious and absolutely gorgeous jars together that will get you excited every time you open your refrigerator. Think of it as creating your very own “grab ‘n go”. 

Mix N Match Bowls

FIRST = Take a peek at your pantry practice 

{NOTE}    Do you have your whole grains where you can see them? List them. 

{NOTE}    What do you have for protein options? List them. 

{NOTE}    Make a list of all fresh and frozen vegetables available. 


 

SECOND =  Choose TWO different grains to incorporate (the purpose is FIBER) 

{NOTE}    These are Gluten-free: 

  • red or white quinoa
  • brown or wild rice
  • buckwheat (Kasha)
  • millet
  • amaranth 

{NOTE}    You may also use these whole grains: 

  • wheat berries
  • farro
  • kamut
  • spelt
  • barley

{NOTE}    1 cup of dry grain + 2 cups of water = 4 servings

Rice Cooker Directions: Place grain + water in cooker and PRESS THE BUTTON. Don’t forget to check on it to make sure it doesn’t burn. Most grains will be done between 10 – 40 minutes. 

{NOTE}    Add 1 TB Olive Oil or Coconut Oil (It will help you absorb Vitamins A, D, E and K)

Stove Directions: Place grain + water in a small pot, bring water to a boil, then turn down to simmer until water is absorbed and grain is tender. Each grain requires a slightly different cooking time. 

Now the grain will be ready to add 1/2 cup COOKED grain to Vegetables + Protein! 


 THIRD = Cook your Vegetables anyway you choose

  • Saute 
  • Roast
  • Steam 
  • Grill 
  • Leave fresh + crisp 

{NOTE}    Add 1 TB Olive Oil or Coconut Oil (It will help you absorb Vitamins A, D, E and K)

{NOTE}    Choose seasonal vegetables when possible 

{NOTE}    Always add dark leafy greens 


FOURTH = Choose your protein options {more plants}

  • 1/2 cup cooked Chickpeas, Black Beans, Pinto, Lentils
  • Fish {6 ounces} – Haddock, Salmon, Monkfish, Mackerel, Tuna, Squid 
  • Shellfish {6 ounces} – shrimp, oysters, mussels, clams, scallops
  • Pasture-Raised Chicken or Poultry {4 ounces}
  • Grass-fed Beef or Bison {3 ounces}
  • Venison or Duck {3 ounces}

{NOTE}    We are NOT counting calories!

A calorie is NOT a calorie. In order to feel your best this season, try identifying whether your food choices are a {protein} or {fiber}. This will automatically give your food a purpose. If your choices aren’t proteins or fibers, they are most likely empty calorie options that aren’t supplying your body with nutrition. In this case, you won’t end up satisfied and your body will be looking for more. Look at the example below and see what can happen when you don’t plan ahead and wind up eating impulsively with empty calories.

Let’s take a look at some of my intuitive assembles

Tempeh + Buttercup Squash + Spinach + Eggplant + Spelt Berries

Tempeh Grain Bowl

 Tofu + Butternut Squash + Mushrooms + Spinach + Cabbage + Farro

Tofu and Vegetable Bowl

Shrimp + Broccoli + Kale + Wheat Berries 

Shrimp and Broccoli Bowl

Almonds + Mango + Blackberries + Millet 

Breakfast Bowl Ingredients

This can open up a whole new way of thinking about your breakfast. The challenge is time. We simply don’t have enough, or do we!?  Another challenge is getting the foods we need in the correct combination to manage our blood sugars, energy levels and hunger though out the day, meaning we really need to focus on getting protein AND fiber every time we eat, especially at breakfast.

For example, some of us may just have a bagel or muffin for breakfast, which will spike your blood sugars. This results in low energy levels and more cravings for the rest of the day. It is the protein and fiber combination that really fuels your body the best. So, let’s practice with breakfast to set the tone for the day.

Breakfast fuel should include a Protein + Whole Grain + Fruit

{NOTE}    If you incorporate potatoes into your breakfast, you may choose to skip the grain. For example, Egg + Sweet Potato + Kale 

Breakfast Bowl